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The Jan Mayen microcontinent: an update of its architecture, structural development and role during the transition from the Ægir Ridge to the mid-oceanic Kolbeinsey Ridge

By
A. Blischke
A. Blischke
Iceland GeoSurvey, Branch at Akureyri, Rangárvöllum, 602 Akureyri, Iceland
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C. Gaina
C. Gaina
Centre for Earth Evolution and Dynamics, University of Oslo, Sem Sælands vei 24, PO Box 1048, Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway
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J. R. Hopper
J. R. Hopper
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark
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G. Péron-Pinvidic
G. Péron-Pinvidic
Geological Survey of Norway, Postboks 6315 Sluppen, Trondheim 7491, Norway
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B. Brandsdóttir
B. Brandsdóttir
Institute of Earth Science, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Askja, Sturlugata 7, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
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P. Guarnieri
P. Guarnieri
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark
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Ö. Erlendsson
Ö. Erlendsson
Iceland GeoSurvey, Grensásvegi 9, 108 Reykjavík, Iceland
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K. Gunnarsson
K. Gunnarsson
Iceland GeoSurvey, Grensásvegi 9, 108 Reykjavík, Iceland
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract:

We present a revised tectonostratigraphy of the Jan Mayen microcontinent (JMMC) and its southern extent, with the focus on its relationship to the Greenland–Iceland–Faroe Ridge area and the Faroe–Iceland Fracture Zone. The microcontinent’s Cenozoic evolution consists of six main phases corresponding to regional stratigraphic unconformities. Emplacement of Early Eocene plateau basalts at pre-break-up time (56–55 Ma), preceded the continental break-up (55 Ma) and the formation of seawards-dipping reflectors (SDRs) along the eastern and SE flanks of the JMMC. Simultaneously with SDR formation, orthogonal seafloor spreading initiated along the Ægir Ridge (Norway Basin) during the Early Eocene (C24n2r, 53.36 Ma to C22n, 49.3 Ma). Changes in plate motions at C21n (47.33 Ma) led to oblique seafloor spreading offset by transform faults and uplift along the microcontinent’s southern flank. At C13n (33.2 Ma), spreading rates along the Ægir Ridge started to decrease, first south and then in the north. This was probably complemented by intra-continental extension within the JMMC, as indicated by the opening of the Jan Mayen Basin – a series of small pull-apart basins along the microcontinent’s NW flank. JMMC was completely isolated when the mid-oceanic Kolbeinsey Ridge became fully established and the Ægir Ridge was abandoned between C7 and C6b (24–21.56 Ma).

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

The NE Atlantic Region. A Reappraisal of Crustal Structure, Tectonostratigraphy and Magmatic Evolution

G. Péron-Pinvidic
G. Péron-Pinvidic
Geological Survey of Norway, Norway
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J. R. Hopper
J. R. Hopper
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Denmark
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T. Funck
T. Funck
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Denmark
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M. S. Stoker
M. S. Stoker
British Geological Survey, UK
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C. Gaina
C. Gaina
University of Oslo, Norway
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J. C. Doornenbal
J. C. Doornenbal
Geological Survey of The Netherlands, The Netherlands
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U. E. Árting
U. E. Árting
Faroese Geological Survey, Faroe Islands
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The Geological Society of London
Volume
447
ISBN electronic:
978-1-78620-37-00
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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