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Moho and basement depth in the NE Atlantic Ocean based on seismic refraction data and receiver functions

By
Thomas Funck
Thomas Funck
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, 1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark
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Wolfram H. Geissler
Wolfram H. Geissler
Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Am Alten Hafen 26, 27568 Bremerhaven, Germany
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Geoffrey S. Kimbell
Geoffrey S. Kimbell
British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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Sofie Gradmann
Sofie Gradmann
Geological Survey of Norway, Leiv Eirikssons vei 39, 7040 Trondheim, Norway
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Ögmundur Erlendsson
Ögmundur Erlendsson
Iceland Geosurvey, Grensásvegi 9, 108 Reykjavík, Iceland
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Kenneth McDermott
Kenneth McDermott
UCD School of Geological Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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Uni K. Petersen
Uni K. Petersen
Faroese Earth and Energy Directorate, Brekkutún 1, 110 Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract:

Seismic refraction data and results from receiver functions were used to compile the depth to the basement and Moho in the NE Atlantic Ocean. For interpolation between the unevenly spaced data points, the kriging technique was used. Free-air gravity data were used as constraints in the kriging process for the basement. That way, structures with little or no seismic coverage are still presented on the basement map, in particular the basins off East Greenland. The rift basins off NW Europe are mapped as a continuous zone with basement depths of between 5 and 15 km. Maximum basement depths off NE Greenland are 8 km, but these are probably underestimated. Plate reconstructions for Chron C24 (c. 54 Ma) suggest that the poorly known Ammassalik Basin off SE Greenland may correlate with the northern termination of the Hatton Basin at the conjugate margin. The most prominent feature on the Moho map is the Greenland–Iceland–Faroe Ridge, with Moho depths >28 km. Crustal thickness is compiled from the Moho and basement depths. The oceanic crust displays an increased thickness close to the volcanic margins affected by the Iceland plume.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

The NE Atlantic Region. A Reappraisal of Crustal Structure, Tectonostratigraphy and Magmatic Evolution

G. Péron-Pinvidic
G. Péron-Pinvidic
Geological Survey of Norway, Norway
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J. R. Hopper
J. R. Hopper
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Denmark
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T. Funck
T. Funck
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Denmark
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M. S. Stoker
M. S. Stoker
British Geological Survey, UK
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C. Gaina
C. Gaina
University of Oslo, Norway
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J. C. Doornenbal
J. C. Doornenbal
Geological Survey of The Netherlands, The Netherlands
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U. E. Árting
U. E. Árting
Faroese Geological Survey, Faroe Islands
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The Geological Society of London
Volume
447
ISBN electronic:
978-1-78620-37-00
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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