Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

‘A charm to impose on the vulgar’: the medicinal and magical applications of the snakestone bead within the British Isles

By
Rachael Pymm
Rachael Pymm
4 Beechtree Avenue, Englefield Green, Egham, Surrey TW20 0SR, UK, Rachael.Pymm@gmail.com
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract:

The medicinal uses of the snakestone bead within the British Isles are surveyed and considered for the first time. The snakestone beads of the British Isles – often annular beads formed of glass or paste, but also other items similar in form – were employed against a variety of ailments, including several of the most deadly childhood diseases of the nineteenth century: teething, whooping cough and ague. In addition, they were used in the treatment of livestock and as a remedy for eye diseases. The eighteenth century saw the snakestone beads conflated with the hag-stone and employed as an amulet against witches and evil spirits.

You do not currently have access to this article.
Don't already have an account? Register

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Geology and Medicine: Historical Connections

C.J. Duffin
C.J. Duffin
Search for other works by this author on:
C. Gardner-Thorpe
C. Gardner-Thorpe
Search for other works by this author on:
R. T. J. Moody
R. T. J. Moody
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
452
ISBN electronic:
9781786203335
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

GeoRef

References

Related

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal