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Book Chapter

CASE HISTORY 5: Ray-Trace Modeling for Salt Proximity Surveys

By
E. A. Nosal
E. A. Nosal
Marathon Oil Co., P.O. Box 3128, Houston, TX 77253
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C.J. Callahan
C.J. Callahan
Marathon Oil Co., P.O. Box 3128, Houston, TX 77253
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R.W. Wiley
R.W. Wiley
Marathon Oil Co., Exploration & Production Technology Center, P.O. Box 269, Littleton, CO 80122
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Published:
January 01, 1991

ABSTRACT

A Gulf Coast salt dome provides the setting for a case history using seismic ray trace modeling in the design and interpretation of a salt proximity survey. The salt proximity survey was undertaken in order to have an independent estimate of the position of the salt flank because an exploration well had penetrated porous sands but surface seismic of two different vintages gave conflicting interpretations of the amount of salt overhang. If sufficient salt overhang existed then a sidetrack well could be justified to test updip extension of the sand.

The salt proximity survey had two parts, one part to image the salt flank at shallow depths and the other to image deeper. Two computer models were constructed corresponding to the two surveys. Various shot locations were tested on the models for ascertaining the zone of salt imaging and associated time-depth curves. The graphic displays of ray patterns from the ray-tracing computer program can be used to develop quality control check routines useful in the field during the acquisition phase of the project. These routines show how some potential interpretative problems can be resolved by the example of inserting a caprock on one of the models to study the change of salt face imaging that occurs. An aplanatic analysis of many ray tracing trials were made in order to understand the effect of parameter changes on the subsequent analysis.

Finally, results of the field program are discussed. Results show that a salt proximity program can be successfully run and integrated with surface seismic information. A large part of the success of the survey was due to the presurvey planning and preparedness that came from the modeling process.

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Contents

Geophysical Developments Series

Seismic Modeling of Geologic Structures: Applications to Exploration Problems

Stuart W. Fagin
Stuart W. Fagin
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Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
2
ISBN electronic:
9781560802754
Publication date:
January 01, 1991

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