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AN INTEGRATED PETROPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE THIN BEDS IN THE KUPARUK A SAND, KUPARUK RIVER FIELD, NORTH SLOPE, ALASKA

By
JERRY SOVICH
JERRY SOVICH
ARCO Exploration and Production Technology 2300 West Plano Parkway Plano, Texas 75075-8499
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JIM KLEIN
JIM KLEIN
ARCO Exploration and Production Technology 2300 West Plano Parkway Plano, Texas 75075-8499
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NEIL GAYNOR
NEIL GAYNOR
ARCO Exploration and Production Technology 2300 West Plano Parkway Plano, Texas 75075-8499
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Published:
December 01, 1996

ABSTRACT

The Kuparuk A sand reservoir has performed beyond the predictions of the original reservoir model. Water break-through has been late, original oil volumes appear to have been underestimated, and hydraulic fracture performance has exceeded expectations. The Kuparuk A sand was deposited in a nearshore, storm-dominated marine environment and is characterized by a high degree of lithologic heterogeneity. It has long been recognized from core that numerous thin clean sands (less than 0.5-1 ft thick) constitute a significant portion of the reservoir. The original petrophysical model was not able to resolve these features and computed “pay” intervals were restricted to thicker (greater than 1-2 ft thick) and less shaly sequences.

Recent work with micro-scanner resistivity data has shown that the thin sand beds can be resolved and the volume of sand computed. The electrical images can easily segregate thin sand and shale lithologies because of their resistivity contrast. This contrast allows the thinly-interbedded sand-shale sequences to be quantified using a net-to-gross curve. Results were calibrated using whole core to verify the image analysis. Integration of the micro-scanner resistivity data with a conventional clay volume algorithm led to a thin-bed model that was applied field-wide. This new thin-bed model is unique in that it has the ability to distinguish the thicker, water floodable pay sands, from the thinner clean beds which may have a lower recovery factor. The relationship between clay volume and net-to-gross determined from the electrical images furnishes a decreasing thin bed sand volume with increasing clay volume. Application of the updated thin bed model should impact the oil-in-place determination and lead to recognition of possible recompletion opportunities in the “A” sand. Additionally, such opportunities may be recognized in the overlying Kuparuk “B” interval where numerous hydrocarbon-bearing thin sand beds may be present.

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Contents

GCSSEPM

Stratigraphic Analysis Utilizing Advanced Geophysical, Wireline and Borehole Technology for Petroleum Exploration and Production

Jory A. Pacht
Jory A. Pacht
Seis-Strat Servies, Inc. Sugar Land, Texas
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Robert E. Sheriff
Robert E. Sheriff
University of Houston Houston, Texas
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Bob F. Perkins
Bob F. Perkins
GCSSEPM Foundation West Hartland, Connecticut
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
17
ISBN electronic:
978-0-9836097-6-6
Publication date:
December 01, 1996

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