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GROUND PENETRATING RADAR: HIGH RESOLUTION STRATIGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF COASTAL AND FLUVIAL ENVIRONMENTS

By
HARRY M. JOL
HARRY M. JOL
Department of Geography University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54702-4004, U.S.A. Previous Address: Department of Geography Simon Fraser University Bitrnaby. British Columbia, Canada, V5A IS6)
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DERALD G. SMITH
DERALD G. SMITH
Department of Geography University of Calgary Calgary. Alberta, Canada, T2N IN4
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RICHARD A. MEYERS
RICHARD A. MEYERS
Department of Geography University of Calgary Calgary. Alberta, Canada, T2N IN4
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D.C. LAWTON
D.C. LAWTON
Department of Geology and Geophysics University of Caigan’ Calgary. Alberta. Canada. T2N IN4
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Published:
December 01, 1996

ABSTRACT

The interpretation and reconstruction of subsurface environments is an important task faced by oil/gas exploration and academic scientists. Of the various geophysical techniques employed in such work, ground penetrating radar (GPR) is increasingly being used to image and assess both modem and ancient depositional environments. The central aim of this paper is to present GPR results delineating modern and ancient coastal and fluvial sequences. GPR investigations were conducted to examine the sedimentary structures at test sites in Washington, Utah, Alberta, and British Columbia. Along coastal Washington State, several GPR profiles, including a grid dataset, were collected. The grid data was displayed, using three-dimensional rendering software that greatly enhanced our ability to interpret the three-dimensional geometry. Results from the GPR study indicate a shingle-like accretionary depositiona! pattern ofbeach and upper shoreface reflections which dip seaward at about one degree of slope. Outcrop and GPR results in the Book Cliffs (Panther Tongue), Utah, show similar stratigraphy. A second comparison of GPR lines shows three modern braided fluvial deposits in Alberta and British Columbia, and an ancient fluvial channel in Utah. Results indicate a variety of depositional features. GPR profiles in modern fluvial environments can aid in the interpretation of ancient fluvial examples and valley-fills.

GPR proved to be a very effective method for mapping subsurface stratigraphy and sedimentary facies of coastal and fluvial environments. Radar stratigraphic analysis, an emerging approach for interpreting sedimentary environments, was used. The results, based on modern analogues and ancient examples, will provide the oil and gas industry with additional insights regarding stratigraphy and specific characteristics of ancient reservoirs.

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Contents

GCSSEPM

Stratigraphic Analysis Utilizing Advanced Geophysical, Wireline and Borehole Technology for Petroleum Exploration and Production

Jory A. Pacht
Jory A. Pacht
Seis-Strat Servies, Inc. Sugar Land, Texas
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Robert E. Sheriff
Robert E. Sheriff
University of Houston Houston, Texas
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Bob F. Perkins
Bob F. Perkins
GCSSEPM Foundation West Hartland, Connecticut
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
17
ISBN electronic:
978-0-9836097-6-6
Publication date:
December 01, 1996

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