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Book Chapter

Diffraction Problems in Fault Interpretation

By
Bruno F. J. Kunz
Bruno F. J. Kunz
Rohol Gewinrtungs A.G., Vienna.
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Published:
January 01, 2016

Abstract

Distinguishing between diffractions and true reflections is often difficult and may lead to misinterpretations. In the Molasse zone of Upper Austria, numerous faults were established by seismic surveying. Diffractions were observed at several antithetic faults but not at synthetic faults. As an example, a seismic record section of the Steindlberg structure is shown. The reflections from the base of Tertiary and from the Cretaceous-Jurassic contact run parallel oveT long distances, and so do the less important reflections lying above and between. If, contrary to the general trend, the reflection from the base of the Tertiary approaches the underlying reflection from the Cretaceous-Jurassic contact, or if the latter diverges from the former, this is considered a criterion for a diffraction.

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Contents

Society of Exploration Geophysicists Geophysics Reprint Series

Seismic Diffraction

Kamil Klem-Musatov
Kamil Klem-Musatov
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Henning Hoeber
Henning Hoeber
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Michael Pelissier
Michael Pelissier
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Tijmen Jan Moser
Tijmen Jan Moser
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Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
30
ISBN electronic:
9781560803188
Publication date:
January 01, 2016

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