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Characterization of particulate matter in attic and settled dusts collected from two buildings in Budapest, Hungary

By
Á. Baricza
Á. Baricza
Lithosphere Fluid Research Laboratory, Department of Petrology and Geochemistry, Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, H-1117 Budapest, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/C, Hungary
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B. Bajnóczi
B. Bajnóczi
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Science, H-1112 Budapest, Budaörsi u. 45, Hungary
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M. Tóth
M. Tóth
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Science, H-1112 Budapest, Budaörsi u. 45, Hungary
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R. Káldos
R. Káldos
Lithosphere Fluid Research Laboratory, Department of Petrology and Geochemistry, Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, H-1117 Budapest, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/C, Hungary
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Cs. Szabó
Cs. Szabó
Lithosphere Fluid Research Laboratory, Department of Petrology and Geochemistry, Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, H-1117 Budapest, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/C, Hungary
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Published:
January 01, 2016

Abstract

We have investigated two buildings covered with Zsolnay glazed architectural ceramics in Budapest (Hungary), one located in the densely built-up area of the city centre with a high traffic rate and one in a city quarter with moderate traffic and more open space. A black crust layer, containing a large amount of artificial particulate matter with different size and chemical composition, was observed on the ceramic material of both buildings, whereas weathered glaze was detected only on the ceramics of the building situated in the city centre. In this paper, our goal is to reveal the role of the particulate matter in the degradation of architectural ceramics. For this reason the attic dust and settled dust from the roofs of the studied buildings were collected. In the attic dust, besides the natural particles of geological origin, three types of artificial particles typically with spherical shape (spherules) were also distinguished: aluminosilicate (two subtypes), carbonaceous, and iron-rich fly-ash. The appearance of gypsum crystallites around the particulate matter in association with all spherule types suggests that the particulate matter greatly contributes to the degradation process.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Sustainable Use of Traditional Geomaterials in Construction Practice

R. Přikryl
R. Přikryl
Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
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Á. Török
Á. Török
Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
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M. Gomez-Heras
M. Gomez-Heras
Institute of Geosciences (CSIC, UCM), Spain
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K. Miskovsky
K. Miskovsky
Envix Nord AB, Sweden
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M. Theodoridou
M. Theodoridou
University of Cyprus, Cyprus
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Geological Society of London
Volume
416
ISBN electronic:
9781862397187
Publication date:
January 01, 2016

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