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Book Chapter

Understanding and Modeling Connectivity in a Deep Water Clastic Reservoir—The Schiehallion Experience

By
Alastair Govan
Alastair Govan
BP Exploration UK Dyce, Aberdeen, AB21 7PB UK
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Paul Freeman
Paul Freeman
BP Exploration UK Dyce, Aberdeen, AB21 7PB UK
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Chris Macdonald
Chris Macdonald
BP Exploration UK Dyce, Aberdeen, AB21 7PB UK
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Merv Davies
Merv Davies
BP Exploration UK Dyce, Aberdeen, AB21 7PB UK
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Davide Casabianca
Davide Casabianca
BP Exploration UK Dyce, Aberdeen, AB21 7PB UK
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Ferry Nieuwland
Ferry Nieuwland
BP Exploration UK Dyce, Aberdeen, AB21 7PB UK
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Neil Moodie
Neil Moodie
BP Exploration UK Dyce, Aberdeen, AB21 7PB UK
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Tim Primmer
Tim Primmer
BP Exploration Operating Co Ltd Chertsey Rd, Sunbury-on-Thames, Middlesex TW16 7LN UK email: alastair.govan@bp.com
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Published:
December 01, 2006

Abstract

Schiehallion is a two billion barrel deepwater clastic reservoir, situated on the Atlantic margin of the UKCS, one of the world’s most hostile environments for hydrocarbon production. The field has been developed via subsea wells tied back to an FPSO, and is one of the first developments of its kind anywhere in the world.

The field may be characterized as high productivity but low energy and, as a consequence, water injection is essential to maintaining production. However, the reservoir is channelized, faulted, and has varying degrees of connectivity between the compartments, so that a good understanding of these factors is necessary to optimize the water injection distribution.

Our understanding of the ‘plumbing’, or connectivity between the wells, has evolved and matured over time, using a wide range of different data types, from the initial extended well test, through RFT’s, pressure transient analyses, interference testing, PLT’s, tracer and geochemical sampling, to bi-annual 4D seismic surveys using increasingly sophisticated processing and interpretation.

Much of this understanding has been incorporated in a 3D model, which uses object modeling and seismic conditioning to represent the sand distribution. Potential barriers to flow are identified from seismic coherency analysis, and the strengths of these barriers have been used as the main history matching parameters.

A key learning has been that all data needs to be interpreted with great care, and it is essential to integrate several data types in order to obtain reliable conclusions. The paper gives examples of data which has been invaluable, as well as examples where the data is ambiguous or misleading.

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Contents

GCSSEPM

Reservoir Characterization: Integrating Technology and Business Practices

Roger M. Slatt
Roger M. Slatt
Houston, Texas
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Norman c. Rosen
Norman c. Rosen
Houston, Texas
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Michael Bowman
Michael Bowman
Houston, Texas
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John Castagna
John Castagna
Houston, Texas
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Timothy Good
Timothy Good
Houston, Texas
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Robert Loucks
Robert Loucks
Houston, Texas
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Rebecca Latimer
Rebecca Latimer
Houston, Texas
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Mark Scheihing
Mark Scheihing
Houston, Texas
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Hu Smith
Hu Smith
Houston, Texas
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
26
ISBN electronic:
978-0-9836096-4-3
Publication date:
December 01, 2006

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