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Book Chapter

Oil Exploration Under the Catastrophist Paradigm

By
James R. Wilson
James R. Wilson
Centre for Future Technologies, Inc. 722 S. Maurine Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401 e-mail: wilson@srv.net
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Mark Holbrook
Mark Holbrook
Centre for Future Technologies, Inc. 722 S. Maurine Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401 e-mail: wilson@srv.net
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Jim Jones
Jim Jones
Centre for Future Technologies, Inc. 722 S. Maurine Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401 e-mail: wilson@srv.net
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Published:
December 01, 2002

Abstract

The uniformitarian paradigm, a key assumption in the interpretation of the stratigraphic record, directs most of the oil exploration, making the history of discoveries a circular argument for this paradigm. However, a plot of giant oil field discoveries shows interesting, nonrandom patterns that are inexplicable under current theory. The catastrophist paradigm explains these patterns and yields interesting insights for discovering future oil deposits.

Ninety percent of the giant oil fields (proven oil>500 million bbl or gas>3 Tcf) and ninety percent of the Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are distributed along two great circles on the Earth. These great circles also intersect the original sites of the craters of the three largest meteorites to ever impact the Earth, suggesting that these patterns or groupings were caused by these meteorites.

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Contents

GCSSEPM

Sequence Stratigraphic Models for Exploration and Production: Evolving Methodology, Emerging Models and Application Histories

John M. Armentrout
John M. Armentrout
Houston, Texas
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Norman C. Rosen
Norman C. Rosen
Houston, Texas
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
22
ISBN electronic:
978-0-9836096-8-1
Publication date:
December 01, 2002

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