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The Egiin Davaa prehistoric rupture, central Mongolia: a large magnitude normal faulting earthquake on a reactivated fault with little cumulative slip located in a slowly deforming intraplate setting

By
R. T. Walker
R. T. Walker
COMET, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3AN, UK
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K. W. Wegmann
K. W. Wegmann
Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
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A. Bayasgalan
A. Bayasgalan
School of Geology and Petroleum Engineering, Mongolian University of Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
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R. J. Carson
R. J. Carson
Department of Geology, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA 99362, USA
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J. Elliott
J. Elliott
COMET, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3AN, UK
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M. Fox
M. Fox
Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USABerkeley Geochronology Center, 2455 Ridge Road, Berkeley, CA 94707, USA
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E. Nissen
E. Nissen
Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines, 150 Illinois Street, Golden, CO 80401, USA
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R. A. Sloan
R. A. Sloan
COMET, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3AN, UK
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J. M. Williams
J. M. Williams
Department of Geology, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA 99362, USA
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E. Wright
E. Wright
Department of Geology, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO 80903, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract

The prehistoric Egiin Davaa earthquake rupture is well-preserved in late Quaternary deposits within the Hangay Mountains of central Mongolia. The rupture is expressed by a semi-continuous 80 km-long topographic scarp. Geomorphological reconstructions reveal a relatively constant scarp height of 4–4.5 m and a NW-directed slip vector. Previous researchers have suggested that the scarp’s exceptional geomorphological preservation indicates that it may correspond to an earthquake that occurred in the region c. 500 years ago. However, we constrain the last rupture to have been at least 4 ka ago from morphological dating and <7.4 ka ago based on radiocarbon dating from one of two palaeoseismic trenches. Our study shows that discrete earthquake ruptures, along with details such as the locations of partially infilled fissures, can be preserved for periods well in excess of 1000 years in the interior of Asia, providing an archive of fault movements that can be directly read from the Earth’s surface over a timescale appropriate for the study of slowly deforming continental interiors. The Egiin Davaa rupture involved c. 8 m of slip which, along with the observations that it is largely unsegmented along its length and that the ratio of cumulative slip (c. 250 m) to fault length (c. 80 km) is small, suggests relatively recent reactivation of a pre-existing geological structure.

Supplementary material: All scarp profiles are available at http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/SUP18871

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions

A. Landgraf
A. Landgraf
University of Potsdam, Germany
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S. Kübler
S. Kübler
LMU Munich, Germany
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E. Hintersberger
E. Hintersberger
University of Vienna, Austria
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S. Stein
S. Stein
Northwestern University, USA
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Geological Society of London
Volume
432
ISBN electronic:
9781862399648
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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