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Chapter 7 R. C. Moore and concepts of sea-level change in the midcontinent

By
Rex C. Buchanan
Rex C. Buchanan
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Christopher G. Maples
Christopher G. Maples
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Published:
January 01, 1992

Raymond C. Moore was among the most important stratigraphers and paleontologists of the twentieth century. Yet, he was among the last of his contemporaries (1892 to 1974) to accept the importance of glacial eustasy for sea-level changes during the late Paleozoic. Moore staunchly defended the concept that sea-level changes and resultant lithologic changes were caused primarily by orogenic and diastrophic processes, noting that orogeny in one part of the world could affect sea level globally. Our impression is that Moore was loath to change his mind once he had reached a decision and was a commanding force who could not be ignored easily. Moore was among the many geologists who operated under an epistomological paradigm of their time—if a single action could explain all results, they refused to complicate the issue by invoking multiple causes. Moore’s principal concerns were not the causes of sea-level change, but the effects, especially the great lateral persistence of thin stratigraphic units throughout the midcontinent.

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GSA Memoirs

Eustasy: The Historical Ups and Downs of a Major Geological Concept

Robert H. Dott, Jr.
Robert H. Dott, Jr.
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Geological Society of America
Volume
180
ISBN print:
9780813711805
Publication date:
January 01, 1992

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