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Chapter 5: A. W. Grabau’s embryonic sequence stratigraphy and eustatic curve

By
Markes E. Johnson
Markes E. Johnson
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Published:
January 01, 1992

One of the most knowledgeable stratigraphers during the first half of the twentieth century was Amadeus William Grabau (1870 to 1946), whose prolific career included wide experience in North America, Europe, and Asia. He was both a proficient field geologist capable of generating his own original data and a brilliant synthesizer with an encyclopedic grasp of received data from the stratigraphic community at large. His Pulsation Theory was introduced in 1933 at the 16th International Geological Congress in Washington, D.C., and it was greatly expanded in 1940 with publication of his book The Rhythm of the Ages. This remarkable book contains the first detailed representation of Phanerozoic sea-level fluctuations related to unconformity-bound units on a global scale.

The origin and gradual development of Grabau’s views on the interrelationship between what is now called sequence stratigraphy and eustasy are traced in this review. An attempt is made to test the accuracy of Grabau’s intercontinental correlations, drawing on a comparative sample of the Silurian System as understood by Grabau and as subsequently refined during the more than 50 years since publication of The Rhythm of the Ages.

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Contents

GSA Memoirs

Eustasy: The Historical Ups and Downs of a Major Geological Concept

Robert H. Dott, Jr.
Robert H. Dott, Jr.
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Geological Society of America
Volume
180
ISBN print:
9780813711805
Publication date:
January 01, 1992

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