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Book Chapter

Review of monitoring issues and technologies associated with the long-term underground storage of carbon dioxide

By
R. A. Chadwick
R. A. Chadwick
British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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R. Arts
R. Arts
Netherlands Institute of Applied Geoscience TNO — National Geological Survey, Kriekenpitplein 18, PO Box 80015, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands
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M. Bentham
M. Bentham
British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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O. Eiken
O. Eiken
StatoilHydro Research Centre, Rotvoll, N-7005 Trondheim, Norway
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S. Holloway
S. Holloway
British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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G. A. Kirby
G. A. Kirby
British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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J. M. Pearce
J. M. Pearce
British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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J. P. Williamson
J. P. Williamson
British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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P. Zweigel
P. Zweigel
StatoilHydro Research Centre, Rotvoll, N-7005 Trondheim, Norway
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Published:
January 01, 2009

Abstract

Large-scale underground storage of CO2 has the potential to play a key role in reducing global greenhouse gas emissions. Typical underground storage reservoirs would lie at depths of 1000 m or more and contain tens or even hundreds of millions of tonnes of CO2. A likely regulatory requirement is that storage sites would have to be monitored both to prove their efficacy in emissions reduction and to ensure site safety. A diverse portfolio of potential monitoring tools is available, some tried and tested in the oil industry, others as yet unproven. Shallow-focused techniques are likely to be deployed to demonstrate short-term site performance and, in the longer term, to ensure early warning of potential surface leakage. Deeper focused methods, notably time-lapse seismic, will be used to track CO2 migration in the subsurface, to assess reservoir performance and to calibrate/validate site performance simulation models. The duration of a monitoring programme is likely to be highly site specific, but conformance between predicted and observed site performance may form an acceptable basis for site closure.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Underground Gas Storage: Worldwide Experiences and Future Development in the UK and Europe

D. J. Evans
D. J. Evans
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R. A. Chadwick
R. A. Chadwick
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Geological Society of London
Volume
313
ISBN electronic:
9781862395619
Publication date:
January 01, 2009

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