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The modern water interface:: recognition, protection and development – advance of modern waters in European aquifer systems

By
K. Hinsby
K. Hinsby
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Thoravej 8, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark (email: khi@ geus.dk)
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W. M. Edmunds
W. M. Edmunds
British Geological Survey, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK
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H. H. Loosli
H. H. Loosli
University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland
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M. Manzano
M. Manzano
Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Edificio D-2, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
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M. T. Condesso De Melo
M. T. Condesso De Melo
Universidade de Aveiro, Departamento de Geociencias, Aveiro 3800, Portugal
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F. Barbecot
F. Barbecot
Universite de Paris-Sud, Batiment 504, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France
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Published:
January 01, 2001

Abstract

Modem groundwater that has recharged aquifers within the past 50 a shows the influence of humans globally, either by the presence of small concentrations of environmental tracers or in some cases by severe pollution. This study describes important environmental tracers (e.g. 3H, 85Kr, chlorofluorocarbons, SF6) and contaminants (e.g. NO3, pesticides, chlorinated solvents) for modem groundwater dating and recognition of human impacts. Some applications of the described tracers in aquifers investigated in the PALAEAUX study are presented in order to illustrate the advance of modem waters in European aquifer systems. The study shows that the location of the modern water interface varies within a range of between c. 10 and c. 100 m in the investigated aquifers due to variations in hydrogeological setting, climate and exploitation of the groundwater resource. The subsurface distribution of the modem water indicators and contaminants demonstrate that the advance of modem groundwaters and the fate of harmful substances in them have important implications for protection and development of the water resources. Contaminants that do not degrade or degrade only very slowly will advance further into the aquifers and may eventually contaminate even deep groundwater systems.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Palaeowaters in Coastal Europe: Evolution of Groundwater since the Late Pleistocene

W. M. Edmunds
W. M. Edmunds
British Geological Survey, Wallingford, UK
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C. J. Milne
C. J. Milne
British Geological Survey, Wallingford, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
189
ISBN electronic:
9781862394377
Publication date:
January 01, 2001

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