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Book Chapter

Results and Conclusions of a Horizontal-drilling Program at South Pass 62 Salt-dome Field

By
E. P. Mason
E. P. Mason
Shell Exploration & Production Company New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.
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M. J. Bastian
M. J. Bastian
Shell Exploration & Production Company New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.
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R. Detomo
R. Detomo
Shell Exploration & Production Company New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.
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M. N. Hashem
M. N. Hashem
Shell Exploration & Production Company New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.
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A. J. Hildebrandt
A. J. Hildebrandt
Shell Exploration & Production Company New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.
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Published:
January 01, 2003

Abstract

Ahorizontal-well redevelopment drilling program around the flanks of the South Pass 62 salt-dome field resulted in significant successes and costly failures. Successful wells exploited thin, oil-filled shoreface sandstones; partially depleted zones; and massive, sand-filled channels. Failures were those wells that attempted to connect multiple fault blocks and drain low-resistivity/laminated-sandstone reservoirs. This paper reviews the field history; describes the geologic setting, including a summary of significant structural features and producing-sandstone depositional environments; discusses the horizontal-well strategy; and examines successful and unsuccessful wells.

South Pass 62 field lies 50 km (30 mi) east of the Mississippi River delta in 104 m (300 ft) of water. The field was discovered in 1965, developed with 61 directionally drilled wells from three platforms in the late 1960s, redeveloped from 1986 to 1988 with 31 wells from a fourth platform, and redeveloped again from 1994 to the present with horizontal and directionally drilled slim-hole sidetracks. A 3-D seismic-based field study completed in 1994 identified reservoir targets for the horizontal-drilling program.

Nearly 60 stacked, variable pay sandstones combine with steep formation dips and extensive faulting to create a complex field with hundreds of reservoirs. The field lies on the north flank of a mushroom-shaped, south-leaning salt dome that rises from below 8000 m (25,000 ft) to within 200 m (656 ft) of the seafloor. Typical formation structural dips decrease from 70° adjacent to the salt to 10° off structure. Several generations of faults exist, with throws ranging from centimeters to more than 100 m. Approximately 60 Pliocene and Miocene deltaic and turbidite pay sandstones ranging in depth from 1158 to 5791 m (3800 to 19,000 ft) onlap the salt.

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Contents

AAPG Methods in Exploration Series

Horizontal Wells: Focus on the Reservoir

Timothy R. Carr
Timothy R. Carr
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Erik P. Mason
Erik P. Mason
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Charles T. Feazel
Charles T. Feazel
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
14
ISBN electronic:
9781629810553
Publication date:
January 01, 2003

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