Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

The Discovery History and Geology of Corani: A Significant New Ag-Pb-Zn Epithermal Deposit, Puno Department, Peru

By
Andrew Swarthout
Andrew Swarthout
Bear Creek Mining Corporation, 1050-625 Howe Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6C 2T6
Search for other works by this author on:
Marc Leduc
Marc Leduc
Bear Creek Mining Corporation, 1050-625 Howe Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6C 2T6
Search for other works by this author on:
Christian Rios
Christian Rios
Bear Creek Mining Corporation, 1050-625 Howe Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6C 2T6
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

Corani is a significant recently discovered large silver and base metal deposit situated within the Corani mining district in the central Andes of Peru. The deposit is located 200 km northwest of the city of Puno, between 4,675 and 5,260 m in elevation, and includes 12 mineral claims covering an area of 5.7 km2. The silver, lead, and zinc resources represent low- to intermediate-sulfidation–style epithermal mineralization hosted within 23 Ma rhyolitic crystal lithic tuffs. Potentially economic epithermal gold mineralization also occurs within the district and requires further exploration.

Previous district production includes small-scale underground antimony mining in the 1940s and selective mining from high-grade silver veins during the 1960s. During the 1990s, limited drilling focused upon an epithermal gold zone at the southern limits of the current Corani deposit. Rio Tinto staked the district in 2003 as a porphyry copper system. The presence of such a system remains a possible deep source for the recognized epithermal mineralization. Bear Creek Mining Corporation acquired the district from Rio Tinto in 2005 and drilled the first discovery holes in 2006. To date, more than 93,640 m of diamond drilling has been completed in conjunction with extensive studies in order to understand the controls of the base and precious metal mineralization.

Mineralization occurs as stockwork veins, fracture coatings, and breccias localized within a westerly-dipping listric fault complex resulting from regional extension. These ore-hosting structures cut the rhyolitic tuffs of the Quenamari Formation. Dominant mineral phases include quartz, barite, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, hematite, and freibergite. The total mineable reserve is 139.6 million tons (Mt) averaging 57.5 g/t Ag, 0.94 percent Pb, and 0.46 percent Zn, thus containing 8.03 t Ag (258 million ounces (Moz)), 1.31 t Pb (2.9 billion lbs.), and 0.65 t Zn (1.4 billion lbs.) recovered into concentrates. In addition, 145 Mt of lower grade material is maintained in resources. An understanding of the distribution of mineralization styles, defined by using metallurgical testing, mineragraphic analysis, and detailed core logging, is critical in unlocking the economic potential of the deposit and developing a three-dimensional model for mining. Of particular importance to future development is the overprinting by supergene mineral assemblages, including complex lead and/or barium phosphates and iron and/or manganese oxides.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Special Publications of the Society of Economic Geologists

The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Innovative Exploration, and New Discoveries

Richard J. Goldfarb
Richard J. Goldfarb
Search for other works by this author on:
Erin E. Marsh
Erin E. Marsh
Search for other works by this author on:
Thomas Monecke
Thomas Monecke
Search for other works by this author on:
Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
15 (1)
ISBN electronic:
9781629490397
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal