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Magmatic Contributions to Hydrothermal Ore Deposits: An Algorithm (MVPart) for Calculating the Composition of the Magmatic Volatile Phase

By
P.A. Candela
P.A. Candela
Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742
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P.M. Piccoli
P.M. Piccoli
Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742
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Published:
January 01, 1998

Abstract

Examination of igneous rocks and/or alteration products associated with geothermal systems, ore deposits, and volcamsm suggests that magmatic volatiles may be active agents of acid alteration, ore-metal transport, magma ascent, and volcanic eruption. Thus, an understanding of the magmatic volatile phase (MVP) is critical to pure and applied geology. However, because of its fugitive nature, the magmatic volatile phase is difficult to sample or study. Therefore, experimental and theoretical modeling plays an important role in our attempt to understand magmatic-hydrothermal processes such as those thought to be active in the generation of granite-related ore deposits. Geologic studies of past magmatic-hydrothermal activity include a combination of experimental and field-based methods of analysis. However, the relationship between static, microscale, equilibrium experiments (e.g., studies of element partitioning, phase equilibria, etc.), and the complex, time-integrated natural world is a tenuous one. Without models, the deductive consequences of experiments cannot be tested against field observations.

Candela and Piccoli (1995) refined a model (now called MVPart) that can be used to predict the concentration of ore metals in successive aliquots of a (Rayleigh) fractionating aqueous phase during second boiling. Here the term “second boiling” indicates volatile exsolution from a melt due to crystallization of the melt at a constant pressure. This model is available in the form of a DOS/PC executable file (see Appendix 1). The model requires several different types of input, such as the estimation of intensive parameters (e.g., temperature, pressure, the initial ratio of chlorine to water in the melt)

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Contents

Reviews in Economic Geology

Techniques in Hydrothermal Ore Deposits Geology

Jeremy P. Richards
Jeremy P. Richards
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E3
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Peter B. Larson
Peter B. Larson
Department of Geology Washington State University Pullman, Washington 99164
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Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
10
ISBN electronic:
9781629490175
Publication date:
January 01, 1998

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