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Development history of the foreland plate trapped between two converging orogens; Kura Valley, Georgia, case study

By
M. Nemčok
M. Nemčok
1
Energy and Geoscience Institute at University of Utah, 423 Wakara Way, Suite 300, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA
2
Energy and Geoscience Laboratory at Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK-840 05 Bratislava, Slovakia
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B. Glonti
B. Glonti
3
Frontera Eastern Georgia, 15 Chavchavadze St, Tbilisi, 0179 Georgia
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A. Yukler
A. Yukler
4
Renaissance JMW Energy, Cevdet Pasa Caddesi No. 30/2, Bebek, Istanbul 34342, Turkey
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B. Marton
B. Marton
5
San Leon Energy, Mokotowska Street No. 1, 00–640 Warszawa, Poland
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Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

Structural, sedimentological, well and seismic data from the Kura basin show that the geometry of deformation has been largely determined by thick-skin structures occurring along margins of depressions filled with upper Oligocene–lower Miocene Maykop formation, flanked by highs without Maykop record. Thin-skin structures are detached inside the shaly Maykop formation and inside shale horizons of the Sarmatian–Pontian section. The main shortening took part during Sarmatian–Pontian, followed by subordinate shortening during Akchagylian–present. The thick-skin architecture formed first, reactivating pre-existing rift grain on the foreland plate that refused to flex underneath the load of advancing orogens. The thin-skin architecture developed subsequently, deforming thick-skin structures. During the Oligocene–early Miocene, the foreland basin behaved as a flexural basin, reacting by prominent fill asymmetry to Oligocene loading by the advancing Lesser Caucasus and earliest Miocene–early Sarmatian loading by advancing Greater Caucasus. Subsequently, the basin recorded only vertical movements responding to new orogen loading events. Each loading event was recorded by a shift of marine depositional environments northwestwards, up the SE-plunging Kura Valley. Conversely each quiescence period was recorded by their retreat southeastwards, towards the Caspian Sea.

Supplementary material:

Discussion of the observations from geological and seismic cross sections, additional outcrop photos and data, lithostratigraphic charts of the Greater Caucasus, the Adjara–Trialet and the Eastern Pontides, heat flow map and of the Kura basin, depth distribution of earthquake hypocentres for the Kura basin region, and Apulia map and cross section are available at http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/SUP18626

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Thick-Skin-Dominated Orogens: From Initial Inversion to Full Accretion

M. Nemčok
M. Nemčok
EGI, University of Utah, USA
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A. Mora
A. Mora
Ecopetrol S. A., Colombia
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J. W. Cosgrove
J. W. Cosgrove
Royal School of Mines, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
377
ISBN electronic:
9781862396388
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

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