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Compositional variations of magmas in the Aeolian arc: implications for petrogenesis and geodynamics

By
A. Peccerillo
A. Peccerillo
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Perugia, Piazza Università 1, 06100 Perugia, Italy
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G. De Astis
G. De Astis
INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia), Sezione di Sismologia e Tettonofisica, Via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma, Italy
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D. Faraone
D. Faraone
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Perugia, Piazza Università 1, 06100 Perugia, Italy
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F. Forni
F. Forni
Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali, Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Piazza Porta S.Donato 1, 40126 Bologna, Italy
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M. L. Frezzotti
M. L. Frezzotti
Dipartimento di Scienze dell'Ambiente e del Territorio e di Scienze della Terra, Università di Milano – Bicocca, Piazza Della Scienza 4, 20126 Milano, Italy
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Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

The volcanic rocks of the Aeolian arc exhibit important within-island and along-arc compositional variations that testify to both geochemical heterogeneous mantle sources and different roles and intensities of shallow-level magmatic evolution processes. Calc-alkaline magmas are present on all islands, but dominate in the western arc and at Lipari and Panarea. Shoshonitic rocks are present on the central-eastern islands and are particularly abundant at Vulcano and Stromboli. Mafic and intermediate rocks comprise the bulk of older volcanic sequences for most islands. Rhyolites are restricted to younger activity of the central arc, and become particularly abundant at Lipari and Vulcano. Regional variations of incompatible trace element ratios and Sr-, Nd-, and Pb-isotope signatures in mafic-intermediate rocks document the variable composition of mantle sources, which were contaminated by different types of metasomatic fluids released from an oceanic slab in the western-central sectors and from oceanic slab plus sediments in the east. This metasomatism was superimposed over a heterogeneous mantle wedge, which had a mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB-) to ocean-island basalt (OIB)- type character passing from the centre to the margins of the arc. The OIB-type component in the external arc is attributed to asthenospheric mantle inflow from the Africa foreland, around the borders of a narrow slab during rollback.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Memoirs

The Aeolian Islands Volcanoes

F. Lucchi
F. Lucchi
University of Bologna, Italy
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A. Peccerillo
A. Peccerillo
University of Perugia, Italy
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J. Keller
J. Keller
University Freiburg, Germany
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C. A. Tranne
C. A. Tranne
University of Bologna, Italy
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P. L. Rossi
P. L. Rossi
University of Bologna, Italy
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Geological Society of London
Volume
37
ISBN electronic:
9781862396371
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

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