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Contrasting Styles of Intrusion-Associated Hydrothermal Systems—A Preface

By
Mark D. Barton
Mark D. Barton
Center for Mineral Resources, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
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David A. Johnson
David A. Johnson
Center for Mineral Resources, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
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John H. Dilles
John H. Dilles
Department of Geosciences, Wilkinson Hall 104, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331
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Marco T. Einaudi
Marco T. Einaudi
Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
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Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

Intrusion-related hydrothermal systems represent a large variety of geologic environments that in some cases form large metallic mineral deposits. The deposits examined in this trip represent the spectrum from systems dominated by magmatic fluid (Birch Creek, California and Yerington, Nevada) to those systems in which intrusions serve as heat engines to drive convectively circulating brines derived from sedimentary rocks (Hum-boldt, Nevada). In these examples, nonmagmatic fluids are largely excluded from more deeply emplaced intrusions in a compressive environment, and the hydrothermal composition and ores (e.g., granite W-F, Cu porphyry and skarn) are dictated by the composition of the magma and its mechanism of crystallization and aqueous fluid generation. Magmatic fluids are less important in the shallow crustal ore environment, but apparently contribute to acidic alteration zones located vertically above source intrusions. Using Humboldt as an example, we propose that the Fe oxide Cu-Au ores in the shallow environment require an abundant source of sedimentary brines (typical of evaporitic environments), high fracture permeability (promoted by an exten-sional setting) to allow aqueous fluid flow and dike emplacement, and shallowly emplaced intrusions to serve as heat sources.

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Contents

Society of Economic Geologists Guidebook Series

Part I. Contrasting Styles of Intrusion-Associated Hydrothermal Systems: Part II. Geology & Gold Deposits of the Getchell Region

John H. Dilles
John H. Dilles
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Mark D. Barton
Mark D. Barton
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David A. Johnson
David A. Johnson
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John M. Proffett
John M. Proffett
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Marco T. Einaudi
Marco T. Einaudi
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Elizabeth Jones Crafford
Elizabeth Jones Crafford
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Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
32
ISBN electronic:
9781934969854
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

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