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Book Chapter

Epithermal Mineralization of the Tokaj Mountains, Northeast Hungary: Shallow Levels of Low-Sulfidation Type Systems

By
Ferenc Molnár
Ferenc Molnár
Department of Mineralogy, Eötvös L. University, Budapest Department of Earth Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa
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Tibor Zelenka
Tibor Zelenka
Geological Survey of Hungary, Budapest
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Ernõ Mátyás
Ernõ Mátyás
Geoproduct Ltd., Mád
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Zoltán Pécskay
Zoltán Pécskay
Nuclear Research Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen
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Bernadett Bajnóczi
Bernadett Bajnóczi
Department of Mineralogy, Eötvös L. University, Budapest
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János Kiss
János Kiss
Eötvös Loránd Geophysical Institute, Budapest
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István Horváth
István Horváth
Hungarian Geological Institute, Budapest
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Published:
January 01, 1999

Abstract

The Tokaj Mountains are situated in northeastern Hungary and host one of the oldest Au-Ag-base metal mining districts of the Tertiary-Quaternary volcanic arc of the Carpathians. The first documentation of mining activity of the Telkibánya area in the northern Tokaj Mtns. (Fig. 1) was a 14th century order from the Hungarian Royal Court, in which the borders of the mining field — coincident with the presently known distribution of mineralization — were defined (Benke, 1988). During the Medieval Ages Telkibánya reached the rank of a ‘Royal Mining Town’ and was a regular member of the Council of the Lower-Hungarian Mining Court.

In addition to the mining of precious metals, the Tokaj Mtns. have attracted several generations of Hungarian and foreign geologists, not only because of the world famous ‘Tokaji Aszu’ wine, but because of the volcanological, petrological and mineralogical interest of the area. Desciptions of mining sites and mineral occurrences can be found in old geological publications such as Beudant (1822). Petrological work on volcanic rocks carried out by József Szabó, the ‘Father of Hungarian Geology’ in th Tokaj Mtns. and similar areas of the Carpathians during the second part of the 19th century led to the revision of the classification of ‘trachytes’ (the old name of volcanic rocks) on the basis of plagioclase composition, rock-fabric and genesis.

During the 20th century the Tokaj Mtns. were intensively explored for precious metals and exploited for raw materials such as clays (kaolinite, illite, bentonite), zeolites, pure silica and alunite, as well as

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Contents

Society of Economic Geologists Guidebook Series

Epithermal Mineralization of the Western Carpathians

Ferenc Molnár
Ferenc Molnár
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Jaroslav Lexa
Jaroslav Lexa
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Jeffrey W. Hedenquist
Jeffrey W. Hedenquist
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Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
31
ISBN electronic:
9781934969847
Publication date:
January 01, 1999

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