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Geologic Setting of Mineral Deposits of the Granite Wash Mountains, La Paz County, West -Central Arizona

By
Stephen J. Reynolds
Stephen J. Reynolds
1— Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1404
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Jon E. Spencer
Jon E. Spencer
2— Arizona Geological Survey, 416 W. Congress Street, Tucson, AZ 85701
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Stephen E. Laubach
Stephen E. Laubach
3— Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas, Box X, University Station, Austin, TX 78713
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Sondra S. Peacock
Sondra S. Peacock
1— Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1404
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Stephen M. Richard
Stephen M. Richard
2— Arizona Geological Survey, 416 W. Congress Street, Tucson, AZ 85701
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W. Dickson Cunningham
W. Dickson Cunningham
4— Dept. of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH England
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Published:
January 01, 1996

Abstract

The Granite Wash Mountains are located in west-central Arizona and are contiguous with the Harcuvar Mountains to the northeast and the Little Harquahala Mountains to the south. They are part of the Maria fold and thrust belt, a belt of large folds and major thrust faults that trends east-west through west-central Arizona and southeastern California (Reynolds and others, 1986; Spencer and Reynolds, 1990). In the Granite Wash Mountains, late Mesozoic deformation related to the Maria belt affected a diverse suite of rock units, including Proterozoic crystalline rocks, Paleozoic carbonate and quartzose clastic rocks, and Mesozoic sedimentary, volcanic, plutonic, and hypabyssal rocks. This deformation was mostly deep seated and produced an assortment of folds, cleavages, and both ductile and brittle shear zones. Several discrete episodes of deformation occurred, resulting in refolded folds, folded and refolded thrust faults, and complex repetition, attenuation, and truncation of stratigraphic sequences. Greenschist-facies metamorphism accompanied deformation and was most intense along the major thrusts. Deformation and metamorphism were followed by emplacement of two Late Cretaceous intrusions and numerous Cretaceous to mid-Tertiary dikes.

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Contents

Society of Economic Geologists Guidebook Series

Tertiary Extension and Mineral Deposits, Southwestern U.S.

William A. Rehrig
William A. Rehrig
I. Low-Angle Tectonic Features of the Southwestern United States and Their Influence on Mineral Resources
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James J. Hardy
James J. Hardy
II. Dismemberment of Porphyry Copper Mineralization in the Rosemont-Helvetia District, Arizona
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Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
25
ISBN electronic:
9781934969786
Publication date:
January 01, 1996

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