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Theories of Origin for the Georgia Kaolins: A Review

By
Thomas Dombrowski
Thomas Dombrowski
Engelhard Corporation, 101 Wood Avenue, Iselin, NJ 08830-0770
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Published:
January 01, 1993

Abstract

The research of W. D. Keller was influential in resolving questions concerning the origin of the Georgia-South Carolina kaolin deposits. Keller's research on the factors controlling the formation of kaolinite is the cornerstone for our understanding of the origin of these unique kaolin deposits. The development of the ideas central to our understanding of these deposits are outlined in this paper.

The present view of the origin of the soft kaolin deposits is summarized as follows. Kaolinite was formed by the alteration of feldspar and mica in coarse grained metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Piedmont Plateau and associated arkosic sands. Kaolinitic sediment from the crystalline rocks was carried southeast toward the Cretaceous shoreline. Subsequently, rapid erosion of non-altered crystalline rocks led to the deposition of arkosic sediments with partially altered feldspars. Repeated exposure to the harsh weathering conditions resulted in the alteration of most of the feldspar to kaolinite. The transportation process led to the natural separation of significant amounts of quartz, feldspar, and mica from kaolinite. The kaolin rich sediments were deposited in fresh to slightly brackish quiet water environments associated with fluvial-deltaic settings at the Cretaceous shore. Deposition of kaolinite in fresh water induced face-to-edge flocculation and an open pore structure. Continued rapid addition of fluvial sediment quickly covered the fine material in the sedimentary sequence. Subsequently, groundwater altered the remaining feldspar to kaolinite and this facilitated the formation of large vermicular crystals.

The hard kaolin deposits formed in a different manner. The sea level changes during the late Cretaceous to early Tertiary eventually exposed fine grained metavolcanic rocks of east Georgia and South Carolina to intense weathering conditions. Under these conditions kaolinite formed from fine grained mica in phyllite and fine grained schist. The kaolin rich sediments were transported to the Eocene shoreline and were deposited in brackish to marine environments. Deposition in saline water caused face-to-face flocculation and resulted in a tightly packed sediment that was not easily altered by groundwater.

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Clay Minerals Society Special Publication

Kaolin Genesis and Utilization

Haydn H. Murray
Haydn H. Murray
Dept. of Geological Sciences Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405
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Wayne M. Bundy
Wayne M. Bundy
3026 Chase Lane Bloomington, IN 47401
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Colin C. Harvey
Colin C. Harvey
Dept. of Geological Sciences Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405
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Clay Minerals Society
Volume
1
ISBN electronic:
9781881208389
Publication date:
January 01, 1993

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