Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Pietra Serena: the stone of the Renaissance

By
F. Fratini
F. Fratini
CNR – Institute for the Conservation and Valorisation of Cultural Heritage, via Madonna del Piano, 10 Sesto Fiorentino-Florence, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
E. Pecchioni
E. Pecchioni
Earth Science Department–University of Florence, Via G. La Pira, 4 50121 Florence, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
E. Cantisani
E. Cantisani
CNR – Institute for the Conservation and Valorisation of Cultural Heritage, via Madonna del Piano, 10 Sesto Fiorentino-Florence, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
S. Rescic
S. Rescic
CNR – Institute for the Conservation and Valorisation of Cultural Heritage, via Madonna del Piano, 10 Sesto Fiorentino-Florence, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
S. Vettori
S. Vettori
CNR – Institute for the Conservation and Valorisation of Cultural Heritage, via Madonna del Piano, 10 Sesto Fiorentino-Florence, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2015

Abstract

The most frequently used material in Florentine Renaissance architecture was Pietra Serena, a sandstone that nowadays is found in a quite satisfactory state of conservation. The reason for this is that architects and stone cutters in the past made careful selections of the materials they employed. This conscientious picking out was very important because most sandstone layers have a composition that is not always suitable for assuring an acceptable durability. This paper deals with the mineralogical, chemical, petrographical and physical characteristics of the Pietra Serena sandstone quarried in the hills near Florence in order to verify what was affirmed by Vasari (1568), Tuscan painter, architect and historian of art of the 16th century, and other Tuscan naturalists regarding the quality of this sandstone.

As a matter of fact, analyses demonstrate that the Pietra Serena sandstones quarried in the hills of Settignano (to the northeast of Florence) and in the Gonfolina area (Lastra a Signa, to the west of Florence), are composed of layers particularly rich in calcite present mainly as sparitic cement. This calcitic cement gives great durability to the stone as is demonstrated by the good state of conservation of some Florentine monuments realized with Pietra Serena.

You do not currently have access to this article.
Don't already have an account? Register

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Global Heritage Stone: Towards International Recognition of Building and Ornamental Stones

D. Pereira
D. Pereira
University of Salamanca, Spain
Search for other works by this author on:
B. R. Marker
B. R. Marker
Independent Consultant, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
S. Kramar
S. Kramar
Slovenian National Building and CivilEngineering Institute, Slovenia
Search for other works by this author on:
B. J. Cooper
B. J. Cooper
University of South Australia, Australia
Search for other works by this author on:
B. E. Schouenborg
B. E. Schouenborg
Geological Survey of Sweden, Sweden
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
407
ISBN electronic:
9781862396951
Publication date:
January 01, 2015

GeoRef

References

Related

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal