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International correlation

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C. N. Waters
C. N. Waters
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I. D. Somerville
I. D. Somerville
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M. H. Stephenson
M. H. Stephenson
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Published:
January 01, 2011

Abstract

Globally, the Carboniferous System can be subdivided into two time intervals, associated with a climatic change which produced quite distinct ?oral and faunal distribution and characteristics of sedimentation (Wagner & Winkler Prins 1991). The early Carboniferous, equivalent to the Mississippian of the USA and Lower Carboniferous of Russia, was a time of equitable climate in which sea levels were generally high and successions within low latitudes were typically marine. Unobstructed marine communication between the Palaeo-Tethys and Panthalassan shelves (Davydov et al. 2004) allowed marine fauna to have a world-wide distribution, in which latitudinal variations were stronger than longitudinal differences (Ross & Ross 1988). The late Carboniferous, equivalent to the Pennsylvanian of the USA, and Middle and Upper Carboniferous of Russia, is typi?ed by coal-bearing successions that displayed marked latitudinal climatic differentiation associated with the Gondwanan Ice Age. The mid-Carboniferous boundary, which separates the two climatic periods, is associated with widespread regression and on many cratonic areas by the presence of a non-sequence or unconformity. The comparable transition is seen in Western Europe between the Visean and Namurian stages, though this is not a direct time equivalent of the Mississippian–Pennsylvanian boundary (Fig. 2). The carbonate-dominated succession of the Visean and terrestrial clastic-dominated succession of the Namurian are interpreted as a facies change with no world-wide signi?cance (Wagner & Winkler Prins 1991).

During the Carboniferous, Gondwana was located at high southern latitudes. South America, Africa, India, Arabia, Australia and Antarctica were affected by near-field glaciations.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

A Revised Correlation of Carboniferous Rocks in the British Isles

C. N. Waters
C. N. Waters
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I. D. Somerville
I. D. Somerville
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N. S. Jones
N. S. Jones
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C. J. Cleal
C. J. Cleal
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J. D. Collinson
J. D. Collinson
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R. A. Waters
R. A. Waters
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B. M. Besly
B. M. Besly
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M. T. Dean
M. T. Dean
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M. H. Stephenson
M. H. Stephenson
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J. R. Davies
J. R. Davies
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E. C. Freshney
E. C. Freshney
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D. I. Jackson
D. I. Jackson
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W. I. Mitchell
W. I. Mitchell
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J. H. Powell
J. H. Powell
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W. J. Barclay
W. J. Barclay
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M. A. E. Browne
M. A. E. Browne
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B. E. Leveridge
B. E. Leveridge
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S. L. Long
S. L. Long
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D. McLean
D. McLean
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Geological Society of London
Volume
26
ISBN electronic:
9781862396944
Publication date:
January 01, 2011

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