Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Elastic models of magma reservoir mechanics: a key tool for investigating planetary volcanism

By
Eric B. Grosfils
Eric B. Grosfils
1
Geology Department, Pomona College, Claremont, CA 91711, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Patrick J. McGovern
Patrick J. McGovern
2
Lunar and Planetary Institute, USRA, Houston, TX 77058, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Patricia M. Gregg
Patricia M. Gregg
3
College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Gerald A. Galgana
Gerald A. Galgana
2
Lunar and Planetary Institute, USRA, Houston, TX 77058, USA
4
AIR Worldwide, 131 Dartmouth Street, Boston, MA 02116, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Debra M. Hurwitz
Debra M. Hurwitz
1
Geology Department, Pomona College, Claremont, CA 91711, USA
2
Lunar and Planetary Institute, USRA, Houston, TX 77058, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Sylvan M. Long
Sylvan M. Long
1
Geology Department, Pomona College, Claremont, CA 91711, USA
5
Leggette, Brashears & Graham Inc., 4 Research Drive, Shelton, CT 06484, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Shelley R. Chestler
Shelley R. Chestler
1
Geology Department, Pomona College, Claremont, CA 91711, USA
6
Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2015

Abstract

Understanding how shallow reservoirs store and redirect magma is critical for deciphering the relationship between surface and subsurface volcanic activity on the terrestrial planets. Complementing field, laboratory and remote sensing analyses, elastic models provide key insights into the mechanics of magma reservoir inflation and rupture, and hence into commonly observed volcanic phenomena including edifice growth, circumferential intrusion, radial dyke swarm emplacement and caldera formation. Based on finite element model results, the interplay between volcanic elements – such as magma reservoir geometry, host rock environment (with an emphasis on understanding how host rock pore pressure assumptions affect model predictions), mechanical layering, and edifice loading with and without flexure – dictates the overpressure required for rupture, the location and orientation of initial fracturing and intrusion, and the associated surface uplift. Model results are either insensitive to, or can readily incorporate, material and parameter variations characterizing different planetary environments, and they also compare favourably with predictions derived from rheologically complex, time-dependent formulations for a surprisingly diverse array of volcanic scenarios. These characteristics indicate that elastic models are a powerful and useful tool for exploring many fundamental questions in planetary volcanology.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Volcanism and Tectonism Across the Inner Solar System

T. Platz
T. Platz
Planetary Science Institute, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
M. Massironi
M. Massironi
Università degli Studi di Padova, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
P. K. Byrne
P. K. Byrne
Lunar and Planetary Institute, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
H. Hiesinger
H. Hiesinger
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universitä Münster, Germany
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
401
ISBN electronic:
9781862396777
Publication date:
January 01, 2015

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal