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Book Chapter

Age relationships of the Rembrandt basin and Enterprise Rupes, Mercury

By
Sabrina Ferrari
Sabrina Ferrari
Department of Geosciences, University of Padua, via Gradenigo 6, 35131 Padova, Italy
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Matteo Massironi
Matteo Massironi
Department of Geosciences, University of Padua, via Gradenigo 6, 35131 Padova, ItalyAstronomical Observatory of Padua, INAF, Vic. Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova, Italy
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Simone Marchi
Simone Marchi
NASA Lunar Science Institute, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Boulder, CO 80302, USA
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Paul K. Byrne
Paul K. Byrne
Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305, USALunar and Planetary Institute, Universities Space Research Association, 3600 Bay Area Boulevard, Houston, TX 77058, USA
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Christian Klimczak
Christian Klimczak
Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305, USA
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Elena Martellato
Elena Martellato
Astronomical Observatory of Padua, INAF, Vic. Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova, ItalyDepartment of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padua, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova, Italy
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Gabriele Cremonese
Gabriele Cremonese
Astronomical Observatory of Padua, INAF, Vic. Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova, Italy
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Published:
January 01, 2015

Abstract

The Rembrandt basin is the largest well-preserved impact feature in the southern hemisphere of Mercury. Its smooth volcanic infill hosts wrinkle ridges and graben, and the entire basin is cross-cut by the Enterprise Rupes scarp system. On the basis of the Model Production Function crater chronology, our analysis shows that the formation of the Rembrandt basin occurred at 3.8±0.1 Ga during the Late Heavy Bombardment, consistent with previous studies. We also find that the smooth plains interior to the basin were emplaced between 3.7 and 3.6±0.1 Ga, indicative of a resurfacing event within the Rembrandt basin that is consistent with the presence of partially buried craters. These youngest plains appear temporally unrelated to basin formation, and so we regard their origin as likely to be due to volcanism. We identify the same chronological relationship for the terrain cross-cut by Enterprise Rupes to the west of the basin. Therefore, volcanic activity affected both the basin and its surroundings, but ended prior to the majority of basin- and regional-scale tectonic deformation. If Enterprise Rupes formed prior to the Rembrandt basin, then regional-scale tectonic activity along this structure might have lasted at least 200 myr.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Volcanism and Tectonism Across the Inner Solar System

T. Platz
T. Platz
Planetary Science Institute, USA
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M. Massironi
M. Massironi
Università degli Studi di Padova, Italy
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P. K. Byrne
P. K. Byrne
Lunar and Planetary Institute, USA
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H. Hiesinger
H. Hiesinger
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universitä Münster, Germany
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Geological Society of London
Volume
401
ISBN electronic:
9781862396777
Publication date:
January 01, 2015

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