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Using formation micro-imaging, wireline logs and onshore analogues to distinguish volcanic lithofacies in boreholes: examples from Palaeogene successions in the Faroe–Shetland Basin, NE Atlantic

By
Tim J. Watton
Tim J. Watton
1
Volcanic Margins Research Consortium, Department of Earth Sciences, Science Labs, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
2
Present address: Statoil UK, Ltd., One Kingdom Street, Paddington, Central London, W2 6BD, UK
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Steve Cannon
Steve Cannon
3
DONG UK E&P Ltd, London, UK
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Richard J. Brown
Richard J. Brown
1
Volcanic Margins Research Consortium, Department of Earth Sciences, Science Labs, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
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Dougal A. Jerram
Dougal A. Jerram
4
DougalEARTH Ltd, Solihull, UK
5
Centre for Earth Evolution and Dynamics (CEED), University of Oslo, Norway
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Breno L. Waichel
Breno L. Waichel
6
Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolois, Brazil
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Published:
January 01, 2014

Abstract

Formation micro-imaging (FMI) is a tool that produces micro-resistivity images of the sidewall of the well bore. FMI logging used in conjunction with conventional well logging techniques (e.g. GR, Gamma Ray/RES, Resistivity/NPHI, Neutron Porosity/SONIC, Velocity tools) allows detailed analysis of volcanic lithofacies variation and informs a robust interpretation of volcanic sequences. This methodology is of particular use where rock core data are limited or not present. Examples are presented from the Rosebank Field in the Faroe–Shetland Basin (West of Shetland, UK continental shelf) where the re-establishment of fluvial activity between phases of effusive volcanism resulted in a complex sequence of siliciclastic sedimentary rocks and basaltic lavas. We demonstrate how high-resolution FMI images through this sequence can differentiate internal basalt lava flow features, such as vesicular zones, brecciated intervals, sediment–lava contact relationships and joint/fracture networks. If FMI data exist through volcanic packages and if assessed and calibrated properly via core, sidewall core and field analogue comparisons, it can provide additional constraints on the interpretation and classification of reservoir (siliciclastic) and non-reservoir (volcanic) rocks.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Hydrocarbon Exploration to Exploitation West of Shetlands

S. J. C. Cannon
S. J. C. Cannon
Statoil (UK) Ltd
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D. Ellis
D. Ellis
Statoil (UK) Ltd
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Geological Society of London
Volume
397
ISBN electronic:
9781862396739
Publication date:
January 01, 2014

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