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Book Chapter

Volcano monitoring applications of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

By
Brendan T. McCormick
Brendan T. McCormick
1
COMET+, National Centre for Earth Observation, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK
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Marie Edmonds
Marie Edmonds
1
COMET+, National Centre for Earth Observation, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK
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Tamsin A. Mather
Tamsin A. Mather
2
COMET+, National Centre for Earth Observation, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3AN, UK
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Robin Campion
Robin Campion
3
Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 50 Ave Roosevelt, CP160/02, 1050 Bruxelles, Belgium
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Catherine S. L. Hayer
Catherine S. L. Hayer
4
COMET+, National Centre for Earth Observation, Environmental Systems Science Centre, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AL, UK
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Helen E. Thomas
Helen E. Thomas
5
Department of Geological and Mining Sciences and Engineering, Michigan Technological, University, Houghton, Michigan, USA
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Simon A. Carn
Simon A. Carn
5
Department of Geological and Mining Sciences and Engineering, Michigan Technological, University, Houghton, Michigan, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is a satellite-based ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer with unprecedented sensitivity to atmospheric sulphur dioxide (SO2) concentrations. Since late 2004, OMI has provided a high-quality SO2 dataset with near-continuous daily global coverage. In this review, we discuss the principal applications of this dataset to volcano monitoring: (1) the detection and tracking of large eruption clouds, primarily for aviation hazard mitigation; and (2) the use of OMI data for long-term monitoring of volcanic degassing. This latter application is relatively novel, and despite showing some promise, requires further study into a number of key uncertainties. We discuss these uncertainties, and illustrate their potential impact on volcano monitoring with OMI through four new case studies. We also discuss potential future avenues of research using OMI data, with a particular emphasis on the need for greater integration between various monitoring strategies, instruments and datasets.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Remote Sensing of Volcanoes and Volcanic Processes: Integrating Observation and Modelling

D. M. Pyle
D. M. Pyle
University of Oxford, UK
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T. A. Mather
T. A. Mather
University of Oxford, UK
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J. Biggs
J. Biggs
University of Bristol, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
380
ISBN electronic:
9781862396456
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

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