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Measuring global volcanic degassing with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

By
S. A. Carn
S. A. Carn
1
Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA
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N. A. Krotkov
N. A. Krotkov
2
Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, Code 614, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
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K. Yang
K. Yang
2
Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, Code 614, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
3
Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA
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A. J. Krueger
A. J. Krueger
4
Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
5
Retired
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Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

The ultraviolet (UV) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), launched on NASA's Aura satellite in July 2004, was the first space-based sensor to provide operational sulphur dioxide (SO2) measurements (OMSO2) for use by the scientific community. Herein, we discuss the application of OMSO2 data for the monitoring of global volcanic SO2 emissions, with an emphasis on lower tropospheric volcanic plumes. We review the algorithms used to produce OMSO2 data and highlight some key measurement sensitivity issues. The data processing scheme used to generate web-based OMSO2 data subsets for volcanic regions and estimate SO2 burdens in volcanic plumes is outlined. We describe three techniques to derive SO2 emission rates from the OMSO2 measurements, and employ one method (using single OMI pixels to estimate SO2 fluxes) to elucidate SO2 flux detection thresholds on a global scale. Applications of OMSO2 data to volcanic degassing studies are demonstrated using four case studies. These examples show how OMSO2 measurements correlate with changes in eruptive activity at Kilauea volcano (Hawaii), constrain small, potentially significant SO2 releases from reawakening, historically inactive volcanoes, track long-term changes in SO2 degassing from Nyiragongo volcano (D.R. Congo), and detect SO2 emissions from the remote Lastarria Volcano (Chile), in the actively deforming Lazufre region.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Remote Sensing of Volcanoes and Volcanic Processes: Integrating Observation and Modelling

D. M. Pyle
D. M. Pyle
University of Oxford, UK
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T. A. Mather
T. A. Mather
University of Oxford, UK
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J. Biggs
J. Biggs
University of Bristol, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
380
ISBN electronic:
9781862396456
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

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