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Nyamulagira’s magma plumbing system inferred from 15 years of InSAR

By
C. Wauthier
C. Wauthier
1
GeMMe Unit, Georesources and Geo-Imaging, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium
2
Earth Sciences Department, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium
3
Present address: Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC, USA
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V. Cayol
V. Cayol
4
Lab. Magmas et Volcans, Université Blaise Pascal, UMR 6524, OPGC, Clermont-Ferrand, France
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M. Poland
M. Poland
5
US Geological Survey, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Hawaii National Park, Hawaii, USA
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F. Kervyn
F. Kervyn
2
Earth Sciences Department, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium
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N. d’Oreye
N. d’Oreye
6
Departments of Geophysics/Astrophysics, National Museum of Natural History, Walferdange, Luxembourg
7
European Center for Geodynamics and Seismology, Walferdange, Luxembourg
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A. Hooper
A. Hooper
8
Department of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
9
Present address: School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
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S. Samsonov
S. Samsonov
10
Department of Earth Sciences, Western University, Ontario, Canada
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K. Tiampo
K. Tiampo
11
Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa, Canada
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B. Smets
B. Smets
2
Earth Sciences Department, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium
7
European Center for Geodynamics and Seismology, Walferdange, Luxembourg
12
Department of Geography, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
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Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

Nyamulagira, located in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo on the western branch of the East African rift, is Africa’s most active volcano, with an average of one eruption every 3 years since 1938. Owing to the socio-economical context of that region, the volcano lacks ground-based geodetic measurements but has been monitored by interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) since 1996. A combination of 3D Mixed Boundary Element Method and inverse modelling, taking into account topography and source interactions, is used to interpret InSAR ground displacements associated with eruptive activity in 1996, 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2010. These eruptions can be fitted by models incorporating dyke intrusions, and some (namely the 2006 and 2010 eruptions) require a magma reservoir beneath the summit caldera. We investigate inter-eruptive deformation with a multi-temporal InSAR approach. We propose the following magma plumbing system at Nyamulagira by integrating numerical deformation models with other available data: a deep reservoir (c. 25 km depth) feeds a shallower reservoir (c. 4 km depth); proximal eruptions are fed from the shallow reservoir through dykes while distal eruptions can be fed directly from the deep reservoir. A dyke-like conduit is also present beneath the upper southeastern flank of Nyamulagira.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Remote Sensing of Volcanoes and Volcanic Processes: Integrating Observation and Modelling

D. M. Pyle
D. M. Pyle
University of Oxford, UK
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T. A. Mather
T. A. Mather
University of Oxford, UK
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J. Biggs
J. Biggs
University of Bristol, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
380
ISBN electronic:
9781862396456
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

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