Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Rauisuchia

By
Sterling J. Nesbitt
Sterling J. Nesbitt
Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1800, USADivision of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Stephen L. Brusatte
Stephen L. Brusatte
Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024, USADepartment of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Julia B. Desojo
Julia B. Desojo
CONICET, Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Técnica, Sección Paleontología de Vertebrados, Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia, Av. Angel Gallardo 470, C1405DRJ, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Search for other works by this author on:
Alexandre Liparini
Alexandre Liparini
Departamento de Paleontologia e Estratigrafia, Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Cx.P. 15001, 91540-970, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
Search for other works by this author on:
Marco A. G. De França
Marco A. G. De França
Laboratório de Paleontologia de Ribeirão Preto, FFCLRP, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901, Brazil
Search for other works by this author on:
Jonathan C. Weinbaum
Jonathan C. Weinbaum
Biology Department, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
David J. Gower
David J. Gower
Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

‘Rauisuchia’ comprises Triassic pseudosuchians that ranged greatly in body size, locomotor styles and feeding ecologies. Our concept of what constitutes a rauisuchian is changing as a result of discoveries over the last 15 years. New evidence has shown that rauisuchians are probably not a natural (monophyletic) group, but instead are a number of smaller clades (e.g. Rauisuchidae, Ctenosauriscidae, Shuvosauridae) that may not be each other’s closest relatives within Pseudosuchia. Here, we acknowledge that there are still large gaps in the basic understanding in the alpha-level taxonomy and relationships of these groups, but good progress is being made. As a result of renewed interest in rauisuchians, an expanding number of recent studies have focused on the growth, locomotor habits, and biomechanics of these animals, and we review these studies here. We are clearly in the midst of a renaissance in our understanding of rauisuchian evolution and the continuation of detailed descriptions, the development of explicit phylogenetic hypotheses, and explicit palaeobiological studies are essential in advancing our knowledge of these extinct animals.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Anatomy, Phylogeny and Palaeobiology of Early Archosaurs and their Kin

S. J. Nesbitt
S. J. Nesbitt
University of Washington, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
J. B. Desojo
J. B. Desojo
Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia’, Argentina
Search for other works by this author on:
R. B. Irmis
R. B. Irmis
Natural History Museum of Utah, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
379
ISBN electronic:
9781862396395
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal