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Non-dinosaurian Dinosauromorpha

By
Max C. Langer
Max C. Langer
Departamento de Biologia-FFCLRP, Universidade de São Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
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Sterling J. Nesbitt
Sterling J. Nesbitt
Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1800, USA
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Jonathas S. Bittencourt
Jonathas S. Bittencourt
Departamento de Biologia-FFCLRP, Universidade de São Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirão Preto, BrazilInstituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais,31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Brazil
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Randall B. Irmis
Randall B. Irmis
Natural History Museum of Utah and Department of Geology & Geophysics, University of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1214, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

Ichnological evidence suggests that dinosauromorphs originated by the Early Triassic, and skeletal remains of non-dinosaur representatives of the clade occur from the Anisian to the end of the Triassic. These taxa are small- to medium-sized, vary in feeding and locomotor features, and occurred over most of western Pangaea. They include the small lagerpetids from the Mid–Late Triassic of Argentina and the United States, and the larger, quadrupedal Silesauridae, with records in the Middle Triassic of Africa and Argentina, and in the Late Triassic of Europe, the Americas and northern Africa. The former group represents the earliest diverging dinosauromorphs, whereas silesaurids are more closely related to Dinosauria. Other dinosauromorphs include the archetypal early dinosauriform Marasuchus lilloensis (Middle Triassic of Argentina) and poorly known/controversial taxa such as Lewisuchus admixtus and Saltopus elginensis. The earliest diverging dinosauromorphs may have preyed on small animals (including insects), but cranio-dental remains are rare; by contrast, most silesaurids probably included plant material in their diet, as indicated by their modified jaw apparatus and teeth. Our knowledge of the anatomy and thus relationships of non-dinosaurian Dinosauromorpha is still deficient, and we suspect that future discoveries will continue to reveal novel patterns and hypotheses of palaeobiology and biogeography.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Anatomy, Phylogeny and Palaeobiology of Early Archosaurs and their Kin

S. J. Nesbitt
S. J. Nesbitt
University of Washington, USA
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J. B. Desojo
J. B. Desojo
Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia’, Argentina
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R. B. Irmis
R. B. Irmis
Natural History Museum of Utah, USA
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Geological Society of London
Volume
379
ISBN electronic:
9781862396395
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

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