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The Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE): insights into Precambrian plate tectonics and the development of mantle keels

By
I. D. Bastow
I. D. Bastow
1
Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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D. W. Eaton
D. W. Eaton
2
Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4
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J.-M. Kendall
J.-M. Kendall
3
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
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G. Helffrich
G. Helffrich
3
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
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D. B. Snyder
D. B. Snyder
4
Geological Survey of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0E9
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D. A. Thompson
D. A. Thompson
5
School of Earth and the Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
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J. Wookey
J. Wookey
3
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
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F. A. Darbyshire
F. A. Darbyshire
6
Centre de Recherche GEOTOP, Université du Québec á Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3P8
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A. E. Pawlak
A. E. Pawlak
2
Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4
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Published:
January 01, 2015

Abstract

Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) was designed to understand the processes that formed Laurentia and the Hudson Bay basin within it. Receiver function analysis shows that Archaean terranes display structurally simple, uniform thickness, felsic crust. Beneath the Palaeoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), thicker, more complex crust is interpreted as evidence for a secular evolution in crustal formation from non-plate-tectonic in the Palaeoarchaean to fully developed plate tectonics by the Palaeoproterozoic. Corroborating this hypothesis, anisotropy studies reveal 1.8 Ga plate-scale THO-age fabrics. Seismic tomography shows that the Proterozoic mantle has lower wavespeeds than surrounding Archaean blocks; the Laurentian keel thus formed partly in post-Archaean times. A mantle transition zone study indicates ‘normal’ temperatures beneath the Laurentian keel, so any cold mantle down-welling associated with the regional free-air gravity anomaly is probably confined to the upper mantle. Focal mechanisms from earthquakes indicate that present-day crustal stresses are influenced by glacial rebound and pre-existing faults. Ambient-noise tomography reveals a low-velocity anomaly, coincident with a previously inferred zone of crustal stretching, eliminating eclogitization of lower crustal rocks as a basin formation mechanism. Hudson Bay is an ephemeral feature, caused principally by incomplete glacial rebound. Plate stretching is the primary mechanism responsible for the formation of the basin itself.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Continent Formation Through Time

N. M. W. Roberts
N. M. W. Roberts
NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, UK
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M. Van Kranendonk
M. Van Kranendonk
University of New South Wales, Australia
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S. Parman
S. Parman
Brown University, USA
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S. Shirey
S. Shirey
Carnegie Institution of Washington, USA
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P. D. Clift
P. D. Clift
Louisiana State University, USA
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Geological Society of London
Volume
389
ISBN electronic:
9781862396654
Publication date:
January 01, 2015

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