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Archaeological investigations in the Torre Spaccata valley (Rome): human interaction with the recent activity of the Albano Maar

By
P. Gioia
P. Gioia
1
Sovraintendenza Comunale ai Beni Culturali, Piazza Lovatelli 35, 00186 Rome, Italy
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A. Arnoldus-Huyzendveld
A. Arnoldus-Huyzendveld
2
Digiter Geoinformatica, Via della Fortezza, 58, 00040 Rocca di Papa (RM), Italy
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A. Celant
A. Celant
3
Sapienza Università di Roma, Dipartimento di Biologia Vegetale, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
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C. Rosa
C. Rosa
4
Fondazione Ing. C. M. Lerici, Politecnico di Milano, Via Vittorio Veneto 108, 00187 Rome, Italy
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R. Volpe
R. Volpe
5
Sovraintendenza Comunale ai Beni Culturali, Piazza Lovatelli 35, 00186 Rome, Italy
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

The Torre Spaccata valley, situated in the southeastern suburbs of Rome, was investigated between 1997 and 1998 and again in 2006. It lies about 15 km from the Colli Albani volcanic complex, the recent evolution of which incorporates deposition of the volcanic-sedimentary sequence of the Tavolato Formation (including the Albano lahar deposits). During the excavations, a limited strip of lahar was uncovered and dated archaeologically to the fourth century BCE. Other main features include several intercrossing channels with a sandy-pebbly fill, evidence of intermittent hydrological activity. In this area there is evidence of a prolonged interaction through time between human activity and the valley’s varying environments. The prehistoric evidence (third to second millennium BCE) is well documented in a concentration of sites on the eastern outskirts of Rome. The prehistoric evidence (third to second millennium BCE) has a good context in the concentration of sites in the eastern outskirts of Rome. Other reliable traces date to the fourth to third century BCE, soon after local lahar deposition. During the Late Republican and Imperial period, the hilltops were occupied by a dense system of villae. Later remains provide evidence for agricultural use of the valley floor during the Middle Ages.

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Contents

Special Publications of IAVCEI

The Colli Albani Volcano

Geological Society of London
Volume
3
ISBN electronic:
9781862396258
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

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