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Book Chapter

Carboniferous

By
John Athersuch
John Athersuch
StrataData Ltd, 17 The Bothy, Ottershaw Park, Ottershaw, Surrey KT16 OQG, UK
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Andrew J. Gooday
Andrew J. Gooday
School of Ocean & Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK (e-mail: ang@noc.soton.ac.uk)
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John E. Pollard
John E. Pollard
School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK (e-mail: john.pollard@manchester.ac.uk)
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Nick J. Riley
Nick J. Riley
British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK (e-mail: njr@bgs.ac.uk)
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Published:
January 01, 2009

Abstract

During the 19th century studies of ostracods of the British Carboniferous were promoted by the extraction of coal, iron and other minerals. As described in more detail later, this was a period of great activity resulting in numerous publications concerned with ostracod taxonomy but few with stratigraphic applications.

Despite renewed economic importance of the Carboniferous in the latter part of the 20th century resulting from the exploration for oil and gas, further publication on British Carboniferous ostracod faunas was rather limited as the biostratigraphic application of other groups (miospores, foraminifera and conodonts) gained precedence. Compared to some other Periods, ostracods have consequently played a fairly insignificant role in industrial biostratigraphy in the Carboniferous.

The most significant work towards the end on the century was by Robinson (1978a), in a forerunner to this publication. That account stands out as a work of importance in our understanding of British Carboniferous ostracod faunas. In the present chapter we have drawn heavily upon Robinson's work but expanded its scope by including entomozoids from the Courceyan marine basin facies and Westphalian species from non-marine deposits and marine bands. We hope, therefore, the result will be a useful synthesis of our knowledge of British Carboniferous ostracods as it stands at the beginning of the 21st century, even though there is still considerable scope for future work in the fields of taxonomy, palaeoecology and stratigraphy.

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Contents

The Micropalaeontological Society, Special Publications

Ostracods in British Stratigraphy

Geological Society of London
Volume
3
ISBN electronic:
9781862396210
Publication date:
January 01, 2009

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