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Book Chapter

Basin-scale salt tectonic processes of the Laurentian Basin, Eastern Canada: insights from integrated regional 2D seismic interpretation and 4D physical experiments

By
J. Adam
J. Adam
Salt Dynamics Group, Department of Earth Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4J1, CanadaDepartment of Earth Sciences, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, United Kingdom
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C. Krezsek
C. Krezsek
Salt Dynamics Group, Department of Earth Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4J1, CanadaOMV Petrom S.A., E&P Headquarters, Eroilor Square 1A, RO-100316, Ploiesti, Romania
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Published:
January 01, 2012

Abstract

This study integrates seismic interpretation and 3D analogue experiments monitored by digital image correlation techniques to investigate the evolution of the salt structures and the related depositional systems in the Laurentian Basin offshore Atlantic Canada. During the late Triassic, a layer of more than 3 km thick salt was deposited locally in a set of interconnected rift half-grabens forming a 50–70 km wide evaporite basin in the northern part of the Scotian Basin salt provinces. High sediment input in the Jurassic and early Cretaceous mobilized the salt into complex salt tectonic features, which suggest four kinematic domains with: (1) salt welds and pillows; (2) extensional diapirs and canopies; (3) contractional diapirs and folds; and (4) allochthonous salt nappe. The landward grabens trapped most of the Early Jurassic sediments by passive downbuilding into the salt with local extension. The expelled salt has been evacuated basinwards into a large contractional salt massif. The rapid advance of the allochthonous nappe was coeval with the Late Jurassic extensional collapse of the inflated salt massif due to seaward sediment progradation. Late Cretaceous and Tertiary progradation over the salt nappe caused extensional deformation with growth faulting and formation of minibasins on the secondary salt detachment level.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Salt Tectonics, Sediments and Prospectivity

G. I. Alsop
G. I. Alsop
University of Aberdeen, UK
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S. G. Archer
S. G. Archer
University of Aberdeen, UK
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A. J. Hartley
A. J. Hartley
University of Aberdeen, UK
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N. T. Grant
N. T. Grant
ConocoPhillips UK Ltd, Aberdeen, UK
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R. Hodgkinson
R. Hodgkinson
Bowleven plc, Edinburgh, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
363
ISBN electronic:
9781862396111
Publication date:
January 01, 2012

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