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Book Chapter

Opportunity-driven hydrological model development in US Army research and development programs

By
Charles W. Downer
Charles W. Downer
US Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, Mississippi, USA
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Fred L. Ogden
Fred L. Ogden
Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, USA
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William D. Martin
William D. Martin
US Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, Mississippi, USA
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Russell S. Harmon
Russell S. Harmon
US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, International Research Office, London, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2012

Abstract

The US Army has compelling needs for making hydrological forecasts. These range from tactical predictions of water levels and soil moisture, to strategic protection of both Army and civilian assets and environmental resources. This paper discusses the history of hydrological model development by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as influenced by changes in needs and technologies. It concludes with a description of the Gridded Surface/Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA™) model, a two-dimensional, structured-grid, physics-based hydrological, hydrodynamic, sediment and nutrient/contaminant transport model, developed over the past two decades, that is currently used by the USACE. The surface hydrology of the USA has been divided by the US Geological Survey into 21 major geographic domains that contain either the drainage area of a major river or the combined drainage areas of a series of rivers of similar character developed in one geographic province. Eighteen of the regions occupy the land area of the conterminous USA. Alaska, the Hawaiian Islands and Puerto Rico are separate domains. This approach provides a framework for the hydrological modelling discussed in this paper for sites within six of these regions. That the physics-based GSSHA modelling capability has so far been applied with success gives confidence in its more widespread application.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Military Aspects of Hydrogeology

E. P. F. Rose
E. P. F. Rose
Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
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J. D. Mather
J. D. Mather
Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
362
ISBN electronic:
9781862396104
Publication date:
January 01, 2012

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