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Groundwater as a military resource: pioneering British military well boring and hydrogeology in World War I

By
Edward P. F. Rose
Edward P. F. Rose
Department of Earth Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK (e-mail: mather@jjgeology.eclipse.co.uk)
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Published:
January 01, 2012

Abstract

The first British Army hydrogeologist to be deployed as such on a battlefield was Lieutenant W.B.R. King, in June 1915 on the Western Front. There, the British Expeditionary Force, in Belgium and northern France, expanded at its peak to five armies: 1.5 million men and 0.5 million horses/mules, each man/animal requiring on average 10 gallons (45 l) per day of potable water. A ‘Water Boring Section Royal Engineers’ was eventually raised for each army, equipped with American-made ‘portable’ drilling rigs, and utilizing air-lift pumps. These innovations and King's pioneering ‘water supply’ maps facilitated the development of the British Army's first operational ability to exploit groundwater from deep aquifers, primarily those in Cretaceous Chalk, by drilling >470 boreholes. Additionally, in 1915, a report by three ‘British’ Geological Survey officers helped guide limited boring within Allied amphibious landing areas on the Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey. A civilian water adviser, Arthur Beeby Thompson, transferred from Gallipoli to the Balkans in January 1916 and thereafter used geology to guide significant groundwater abstraction by siting 125 military boreholes and 211 Norton tube wells. From 1915, the Director of the Geological Survey of Egypt, W.F. Hume, provided similar guidance for campaigns from Egypt into Palestine.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Military Aspects of Hydrogeology

E. P. F. Rose
E. P. F. Rose
Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
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J. D. Mather
J. D. Mather
Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
362
ISBN electronic:
9781862396104
Publication date:
January 01, 2012

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