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The origin of fibrous veins: Constraints from geochemistry

By
Marlina A. Elburg
Marlina A. Elburg
Department of Geology and Geophysics, Adelaide University, Adelaide SA5005, AustraliaDepartment of Geochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, PO Box 3060, 55020 Mainz, Germany
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Paul D. Bons
Paul D. Bons
Tektonophysik, Institut für Geowissenschaften, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz, GermanyInstitut für Geowissenschaften, Eberhard Karls Universität, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
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John Foden
John Foden
Department of Geology and Geophysics, Adelaide University, Adelaide SA5005, Australia
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Cees W. Passchier
Cees W. Passchier
Tektonophysik, Institut für Geowissenschaften, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz, Germany
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Published:
January 01, 2002

Abstract

Several recent studies have suggested that antitaxial fibrous veins may form without fracturing, and not by the commonly invoked crack-seal mechanism. It has also been suggested that such veins would derive their nutrients locally by diffusional transport. This hypothesis was tested on carbonaceous shale-hosted antitaxial fibrous calcite veins from Oppaminda Creek in the northern Flinders Ranges, South Australia. Apart from their fibrous texture, these veins lack the classical features of crack-seal veins, such as wallrock-parallel inclusion bands.

Diffusional transport of locally derived calcite cannot explain all major and trace element data of the veins and their adjacent wallrock and indicate that part of the calcite was transported over distances of at least >decimetres, probably ≫100m. Sr isotopic fingerprinting shows that an external fluid that carried radiogenic Sr must have percolated through the system. Fluid flow was pervasive as there is no evidence that this fluid preferentially percolated through the veins. Our data support the view that antitaxial fibrous veins of the type found at Oppaminda Creek grew in the absence of fractures, but show that such veins do not necessarily indicate local diffusional transport. Our data confirm a recently postulated basin-wide fluid flow event around 586 Ma that is probably related to copper mineralization in the area.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Deformation Mechanisms, Rheology and Tectonics: Current Status and Future Perspectives

S. de Meer
S. de Meer
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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M. R. Drury
M. R. Drury
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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J. H. P. de Bresser
J. H. P. de Bresser
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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G. M. Pennock
G. M. Pennock
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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Geological Society of London
Volume
200
ISBN electronic:
9781862396081
Publication date:
January 01, 2002

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