Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

In situ experimental study of roughness development at a stressed solid/fluid interface

By
Bas Den Brok
Bas Den Brok
1
Geologisches Institut ETH Zentrum, Zürich, Switzerland
Search for other works by this author on:
Jacques Morel
Jacques Morel
2
Institut für Geowissenschaften, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Mainz, Germany
3
Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD), Centre Nouméa, 98848 Nouméa, Nouvelle Calédonie
Search for other works by this author on:
Mohsine Zahid
Mohsine Zahid
2
Institut für Geowissenschaften, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Mainz, Germany
4
Institute for Materials and Processes in Energy Systems (IWV), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2002

Abstract

Theory and experiments have demonstrated that the initially flat surface of an elastically strained solid is morphologically unstable. The elastic strain energy of a rough, corrugated surface is lower than that of a flat one. Hence, stress forces the surface into a rough structure, but the associated increase in surface energy counteracts this roughening. In this way an equilibrium surface roughness consisting of μm-scale grooves and ridges can develop if the solid is transported, e.g. by diffusion through an aqueous solution, from sites of high stress to sites of low stress. We report in situ experimental observations of the surface of elastically strained potassium (K-) alum single crystals held in K-alum solution. The observations confirm earlier reports of the development of stress-induced μm-scale grooves on the surface of this material. The in situ observations show, however, that the stress-induced surface morphology is not a static, but a dynamic structure. The grooves are mobile, and may for example propagate or increase or decrease in length. They may move upwards, downwards, or remain where they are. Others rotate and undulate. It is suggested that if stress is high enough, grain boundaries in (wet) rocks could posses a similar structure of channels, continuously changing position and orientation, in line with the so-called ‘dynamically stable’ island-channel grain boundary structure that is essential to several pressure solution models.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Deformation Mechanisms, Rheology and Tectonics: Current Status and Future Perspectives

S. de Meer
S. de Meer
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Search for other works by this author on:
M. R. Drury
M. R. Drury
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Search for other works by this author on:
J. H. P. de Bresser
J. H. P. de Bresser
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Search for other works by this author on:
G. M. Pennock
G. M. Pennock
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
200
ISBN electronic:
9781862396081
Publication date:
January 01, 2002

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal