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Book Chapter

The effect of fluids on deformations

Published:
January 01, 2002

Abstract

Dead weight uniaxial compaction creep experiments were carried out on fine-grained, super-pure calcite (<74 μm) at room temperature and applied effective stresses of 1–4 MPa. All samples were pre-compacted dry at a stress of 8 MPa, for 30 minutes, to obtain a well-controlled initial porosity. The samples were then wet-compacted under ‘drained’ conditions with pre-saturated solution as pore fluid. Control experiments, which were done either dry or with chemically inert pore fluid, showed negligible compaction. However, samples tested with saturated solution as pore fluid showed easily measurable compaction creep. The compaction strain rate decreased with increasing strain and increasing grain size, and increased with increasing applied stress. Addition of Mg2+ ions to the saturated solution dramatically inhibited compaction. From the literature, Mg2+ ions are known to inhibit calcite precipitation. By comparison with a theoretical model for intergranular pressure solution in calcite, the observed mechanical behaviour and the way that compaction responded to the pore fluid chemistry suggest that, under our experimental condition, intergranular pressure solution is the mechanism of the deformation and that precipitation is likely to be the rate-limiting step.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Deformation Mechanisms, Rheology and Tectonics: Current Status and Future Perspectives

S. de Meer
S. de Meer
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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M. R. Drury
M. R. Drury
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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J. H. P. de Bresser
J. H. P. de Bresser
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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G. M. Pennock
G. M. Pennock
Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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Geological Society of London
Volume
200
ISBN electronic:
9781862396081
Publication date:
January 01, 2002

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