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In the Taemas area, New South Wales, Australia, a swarm of hydrothermal calcite and quartz veins is hosted in upright, open to close folded limestones and shales. Overprinting relationships and vein geometries demonstrate that the vein swarm formed progressively during fold growth and associated reverse faulting. Textures preserved in veins reveal that veins formed via hundreds to thousands of individual dilation and mineral precipitation events. Bedding-parallel flexural slip during fold growth was associated with laminated vein development, and limb-parallel stretching during fold growth was associated with the formation of bedding-orthogonal extension veins. The presence of subhorizontal extension fractures and...

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