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Frozen sediments and previously-frozen sediments

By
H. French
H. French
Departments of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, Canada (e-mail: hmfrench@shaw.ca)
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Published:
January 01, 2011

Abstract

Frozen surficial sediments that are otherwise unconsolidated contain structures and characteristics that are different from those of the same sediments when in an unfrozen state. These differences are usually related to either the nature of the ice contained within the frozen sediment or to weathering processes and chemical precipitates that are associated with freezing and thawing. This paper summarizes (a) the manner in which ground freezes when a landscape experiences the onset of cold-climate conditions and (b) what happens when newly transported sediments freeze following deposition in that environment. In the absence of obvious morphological evidence, the recognition of previously-frozen sediments is problematic. Less well-understood evidence includes secondary precipitates, neoformed clay minerals, seasonal frost cracks and fragipans.

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Geological Society Special Publication

Ice-Marginal and Periglacial Processes and Sediments

I. P. Martini
I. P. Martini
University of Guelph, Canada
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H. M. French
H. M. French
University of Guelph, Canada
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A. PéRez Alberti
A. PéRez Alberti
Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain
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Geological Society of London
Volume
354
ISBN electronic:
9781862396029
Publication date:
January 01, 2011

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