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A structural, geomorphological and InSAR study of an active rock slope failure development

By
I. H. C. Henderson
I. H. C. Henderson
1
Geological Survey of Norway, Leif Eirikssons Veg 39, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
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T. R. Lauknes
T. R. Lauknes
2
Norut, P.O. Box 6434, 9294 Tromsø, Norway
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P. T. Osmundsen
P. T. Osmundsen
1
Geological Survey of Norway, Leif Eirikssons Veg 39, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
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J. Dehls
J. Dehls
1
Geological Survey of Norway, Leif Eirikssons Veg 39, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
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Y. Larsen
Y. Larsen
2
Norut, P.O. Box 6434, 9294 Tromsø, Norway
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T. F. Redfield
T. F. Redfield
1
Geological Survey of Norway, Leif Eirikssons Veg 39, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
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Published:
January 01, 2011

Abstract

Few studies of rockslides have addressed the relationships between structures, geomorphological expression and direct evidence for movement. We employ structural geology, geomorphology and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to investigate the evolution of the surface features developed in response to movement of the Gamanjunni rockslide site in Troms County in northern Norway. The slide is located on a west-facing mountainside, and is bounded by two angled back scarps and a 20°–30° basal sliding plane. The volume is estimated at 24 Mm3 and is therefore among the largest potential rockslides in Norway. InSAR provides a new method to measure the movement of potential rockslides, and thus provides a direct link between qualitative movement data and field observations. We document the relationship between variations in ground movement rates and changing back-scarp geomorphology at the Gamanjunni site as well as movement patterns within the incipient rockslide. We demonstrate that variations in InSAR documents millimetre variations in scarp displacement and that this is reflected in the evolving back-scarp geometry. We conclude that InSAR can provide important information to complement field observations. The ability of InSAR to document landslide movement patterns greatly extends our knowledge of back-scarp evolution and active landslide processes.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Slope Tectonics

M. Jaboyedoff
M. Jaboyedoff
University of Lausanne, Switzerland
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Geological Society of London
Volume
351
ISBN electronic:
9781862395992
Publication date:
January 01, 2011

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