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Wilhelm (Guillermo) Schulz and the earliest discoveries of dinosaurs and marine reptiles in Spain

By
Xabier Pereda Suberbiola
Xabier Pereda Suberbiola
1
Universidad del País Vasco/EHU
,
Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Dpto. Estratigrafía y Paleontología
,
Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao
,
Spain
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;
José-Ignacio Ruiz-Omeñaca
José-Ignacio Ruiz-Omeñaca
2
Museo del Jurásico de Asturias (MUJA)
,
33328 Colunga
,
Spain
3
Grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA, Paleontología, Facultad de Ciencias
,
Universidad de Zaragoza
,
Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza
,
Spain
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;
Nathalie Bardet
Nathalie Bardet
4
UMR 7207 du CNRS, Département Histoire de la Terre
,
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
,
8 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris
,
France
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;
Laura Piñuela
Laura Piñuela
2
Museo del Jurásico de Asturias (MUJA)
,
33328 Colunga
,
Spain
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;
José-Carlos García-Ramos
José-Carlos García-Ramos
2
Museo del Jurásico de Asturias (MUJA)
,
33328 Colunga
,
Spain
5
Departamento de Geología
,
Universidad de Oviedo
,
c/Jesús Arias de Velasco s/n, 33005 Oviedo
,
Spain
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

Wilhelm Schulz (1805–1877), known in Spain as Guillermo Schulz, was one of the most outstanding representatives of the geology and mining industry in Spain during the nineteenth century. Schulz is, likewise, the author detailing the first discoveries of dinosaurs and marine reptiles in Spain. In 1858 Schulz described a supposed dinosaur tooth from the Jurassic of Ruedes (Asturias) as belonging to a shark. Schulz's description, mainly the occurrence of crenulated edges, suggests that the tooth was that of a large theropod. It probably comes from the altered grey marls of the Upper Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) Lastres Formation. Although the exact year of the discovery before 1858 is not known, the Ruedes tooth (currently lost) is presumably the earliest known discovery of a dinosaur body fossil in the Iberian Peninsula. Moreover, Schulz mentioned in 1858 the discovery of plesiosaur remains from the Liassic near Villaviciosa (Asturias). The material probably comes from the Pliensbachian marls and limestone rhythmites (Jamesoni zone) of the Rodiles Formation. As no figure was provided and the specimen is currently lost, we have no definitive certainty about its affinities. However, it represents the earliest marine reptile fossil found in Spain.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Dinosaurs and Other Extinct Saurians: A Historical Perspective

R. T. J. Moody
R. T. J. Moody
Kingston University, UK
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E. Buffetaut
E. Buffetaut
CNRS, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France
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;
D. Naish
D. Naish
University of Portsmouth, UK
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;
D. M. Martill
D. M. Martill
University of Portsmouth, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
343
ISBN electronic:
9781862395916
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

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