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Book Chapter

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 20 Ma

By
Shiming Wan
Shiming Wan
1
Key Laboratory of Marine Geology and Environment
,
Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
,
Qingdao 266071
,
China
2
Institute of Geology and Geophysics
,
Chinese Academy of Sciences
,
Beijing, 100029
,
China
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Peter D. Clift
Peter D. Clift
3
School of Geosciences
,
University of Aberdeen
,
Meston Building, Kings College, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE
,
UK
4
South China Sea Institute of Oceanology
,
Chinese Academy of Sciences
,
164 Xingang Road, Guangzhou, 510301
,
China
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Anchun Li
Anchun Li
1
Key Laboratory of Marine Geology and Environment
,
Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
,
Qingdao 266071
,
China
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Tiegang Li
Tiegang Li
1
Key Laboratory of Marine Geology and Environment
,
Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
,
Qingdao 266071
,
China
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Xuebo Yin
Xuebo Yin
1
Key Laboratory of Marine Geology and Environment
,
Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
,
Qingdao 266071
,
China
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

We reconstruct past changes in the East Asian summer monsoon over the last 20 Ma using samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1146 of Leg 184 in the northern South China Sea based on the major (Al, Ca, Na, K, Ti, etc.) and trace element (Rb, Sr, and Ba) geochemistry of terrigenous sediments. This study and combined review suggests that the long-term evolution of the East Asian summer monsoon is similar to that of the Indian summer monsoon, but distinct from the East Asian winter monsoon. Generally, the Asian summer monsoon intensity has decreased gradually from its maximum in the Early Miocene. In contrast, the Asian winter monsoon shows a phased enhancement since 20 Ma bp. Moreover, our study shows that the long-term intensities of the Asian summer and winter monsoons may have different forcing factors. Specifically, the winter monsoon is strongly linked to phased uplift of Tibetan plateau and to Northern Hemispheric Glaciation. In contrast, global cooling since 20 Ma bp may have largely reduced the amount of water vapour held in the atmosphere and thus weakened the Asian summer monsoon.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Monsoon Evolution and Tectonic–Climate Linkage in Asia

P. D. Clift
P. D. Clift
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R. Tada
R. Tada
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H. Zheng
H. Zheng
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Geological Society of London
Volume
342
ISBN electronic:
9781862395909
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

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