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Limestone on the ‘Don Pedro I’ facade in the Real Alcázar compound, Seville, Spain

By
C. Vazquez-Calvo
C. Vazquez-Calvo
Instituto de Geología Económica, CSIC-UCM, Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/José Antonio Nováis 2, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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M. J. Varas
M. J. Varas
Instituto de Geología Económica, CSIC-UCM, Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/José Antonio Nováis 2, 28040 Madrid, SpainDepartamento de Petrología y Geoquímica, Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/José Antonio Nováis 2, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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M. Alvarez De Buergo
M. Alvarez De Buergo
Instituto de Geología Económica, CSIC-UCM, Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/José Antonio Nováis 2, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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R. Fort
R. Fort
Instituto de Geología Económica, CSIC-UCM, Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/José Antonio Nováis 2, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

This paper discusses the research conducted prior to restoring the ‘Don Pedro I’ facade on the Real Alcázar or royal palace at Seville, Spain. The different types of stone on the facade were located and characterized, and their state of decay mapped. Although other materials (brick, rendering, ceramics, marble) are present on the facade, its main elements are made from two types of limestone: palomera and tosca, each in a different state of conservation and exhibiting distinct behaviour. Colour parameters, real and bulk densities, compactness, open porosity, water saturation coefficient and total porosity were determined to characterize the two varieties. In addition, ultrasonic techniques were used to map the various levels of decay on the facade, stone by stone, for future interventions. The findings show that owing to its petrographical and petrophysical properties, palomera stone is of a lower quality than tosca stone, and has undergone more intense deterioration.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Limestone in the Built Environment: Present-Day Challenges for the Preservation of the Past

B. J. Smith
B. J. Smith
Queen's University, Belfast, UK
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M. Gomez-Heras
M. Gomez-Heras
Queen's University, Belfast, UK Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Instituto de GeologÓa EconÓmica (CSIC-UCM), Spain
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H. A. Viles
H. A. Viles
Oxford University Centre for the Environment, UK
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J. Cassar
J. Cassar
University of Malta, Malta
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Geological Society of London
Volume
331
ISBN electronic:
9781862395794
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

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