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Pore structure and durability of Portuguese limestones: a case study

By
C. Figueiredo
C. Figueiredo
Centre for Petrology and Geochemistry, CEPGIST, IST, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisbon, Portugal
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R. Folha
R. Folha
Centre for Petrology and Geochemistry, CEPGIST, IST, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisbon, Portugal
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A. Maurício
A. Maurício
Centre for Petrology and Geochemistry, CEPGIST, IST, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisbon, Portugal
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C. Alves
C. Alves
University of Minho, Centro de Investigação Geológica e Valorização de Recursos, DCT, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
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L. Aires-Barros
L. Aires-Barros
Centre for Petrology and Geochemistry, CEPGIST, IST, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisbon, Portugal
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

Exposed stone surfaces containing complex systems of pores, fractures and grain boundaries provide the surfaces where chemical, physical and biological deterioration processes take place. The pore space represents the preferred area for physical, chemical and biological weathering processes. It plays a significant role in the behaviour of porous materials. A full understanding of pore-channel network morphology, size and connectivity is important in stone decay assessment and conservation works. A contribution to the understanding of the role played by the pore system in controlling fluid-related properties and resistance to salt crystallization of limestones is presented. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury injection porosimetry (MIP) were used to characterize the pore structure of two Portuguese dimension stones (‘Semi-rijo’ and ‘Moca-Creme’) widely used for pavements and the cladding of buildings. Fluid migration physical tests (open and free porosity, capillary imbibition, and Hirschwald coefficient) were also performed, according to European (EN 1925:1999; EN 1936:1999) and French (N FB 10-504:1973) Standards. The resistance to salt crystallization was determined using European Standard EN 12370:1999. An integrated analysis facilitated comparison between durability results with stone pore network characteristics, fluid transport properties and petrographical features, suggesting the influence of available porosity and bedding.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Limestone in the Built Environment: Present-Day Challenges for the Preservation of the Past

B. J. Smith
B. J. Smith
Queen's University, Belfast, UK
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M. Gomez-Heras
M. Gomez-Heras
Queen's University, Belfast, UK Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Instituto de GeologÓa EconÓmica (CSIC-UCM), Spain
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H. A. Viles
H. A. Viles
Oxford University Centre for the Environment, UK
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J. Cassar
J. Cassar
University of Malta, Malta
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Geological Society of London
Volume
331
ISBN electronic:
9781862395794
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

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